Video: Common Questions About Kids and Chickenpox

Chickenpox is a common childhood illness. But what steps should you take to look after someone who catches it? In this video Dr Rishi Duggal explains what to do if you or your children get chickenpox, and when to get urgent medical advice.

Editor’s Note: Video Highlights

The main symptom is the rash – it can occur in 3 main stages:

  • Stage 1: red spots on face or chest
  • Stage 2: after a couple of hours to a day, spots spread to other parts of body – spots can form fluid filled blisters, very itchy
  • Stage 3: these form scabs or crust – can take several weeks to fall off

How to treat it?

  • Can manage pain with paracetamol (*acetaminophen)
    • Avoid ibuprofen with chickenpox as some may have bad reactions to this
  • Calamine lotions and cremes/gels can help soothe the skin
  • Make sure you’re well hydrated
  • Keep your child out of school and if it’s you, stay away from work

How do you catch it?

  • Chickenpox is HIGHLY contagious – really easy to spread:
    • Through droplets infected person has breathed, sneezed or coughed out
    • Through contact with fluid from blisters
    • Even being in same room with someone for 15 mins who has chicken pox

When to get help

  • Contact your GP (*doctor) or NHS 111 if:
    • You’re not sure if you or your child has it
    • Your baby is less than 4 weeks old and has it
    • If you’re pregnant or have a weakened immune system
    • If your symptoms aren’t improving after a week
  • In rare situations your skin can become red or swollen and even more rare, you can find it difficult to breathe.  Seek urgent advice.

Editor’s Note: *clarification provided for our US readers.





About the Author

NHS Choices (www.nhs.uk) is the UK’s biggest health website. It provides a comprehensive health information service to help put you in control of your healthcare.

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