Summer Days

Last updated on June 21st, 2018 at 06:25 pm

So far between Memorial Day and the 4th of July, over 70 children have already summer sportsdrowned and there have been another 80 near drownings. Since this heatwave began just a few days ago, over 9 people have died from heat-related events. Being outside in 100-degree weather causes adults to lose a quart of water each hour. Water loss in children is proportional. Very young children are more susceptible. And the effects of the heat- may be fatal in as little as a day.

Temperatures on the asphalt are typically ten degrees more than surrounding grass. And autos- even with windows ‘cracked’ may reach temperatures in excess of 130 degrees in just a few minutes. This is never a safe place for kids or pets-not even for a few seconds-NEVER. Don’t do it. It’s also difficult to know the right thing to do when it comes to kids sports activities such as little league and youth soccer. When is it too hot? When should a game be called on account of heat?

You rarely if ever hear of a little league game being called due to heat but at least once a year there is a headline about a child who dies playing in the incredible heat. And we wonder why, why did they play? No kid wants to be the wimp and no parent wants to be the only one- the only holdout who hears, ‘but Mom all the other kids still get to go.’ Here are some tips to help keep your child safe this summer.

Pool Safety-What can you do?

  • Never let kids swim alone- keep a close eye- look for problems. If you can’t keep a dedicated eye- postpone your child’s swim even if you must endure some whining.
  • Make sure all pools are fenced and gated. Invest in floating alarms.
  • Keep flotation devices poolside.
  • If your pool is not deep- is not designed for diving- tell kids it’s not allowed- mean it.
  • Learn CPR

This Heat- What can you do.

  • Keep water handy. Drink up before you feel thirsty- stay ahead of dehydration. Alcoholic and caffeinated beverages are not as good as water and sports drinks.
  • Keep kids cool especially infants they simply have the same temperature regulation capability that we do.
  • Same with seniors- the most dangerous place for many seniors is in their home. Either they have no AC or won’t use it due to limited funds. Take them to a senior center, mall or cooling station.
  • If you must go outside for any time- WEAR SUNSCREEN.
  • If a person in this heat stops sweating get help immediately- this may be heat stroke- a serious medical emergency.
  • Learn CPR

Sports Activities- What can you do?

  • Speak up- voice your concerns- talk to other parents and coaches.
  • Have these discussions with league authorities prior to the first game being played. There are similar understandings and rules for when there is lightning in the area. Make it a rule.
  • Get a doctor involved. Perhaps one of the parents is a doctor and can help set realistic guidelines.
  • Remember too that this is not a safe environment for grandparents, siblings, and others with heart and other health problems.
  • If it comes down to it- when all else fails, even if you are the only one- keep your child back if you feel its too damn hot.

Kitchen Safety: Do You Know What to Do If…?

Last updated on March 3rd, 2018 at 01:14 pm

Steaming tea kettleTypical, isn’t it? You’re flying between cooktop and cutting board, prepping dinner while the kids finish homework. In a moment of distraction, you grab a scorching saucepan handle or slice the tip of your finger with a paring knife … or the budding young chef in your family does. Whatever the kitchen slipup, chances are the remedy is within arm’s reach, says Dr. Jennifer Avegno, an emergency medicine specialist at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans. Here, her advice for treating everyday kitchen injuries.

1. Cuts
Food prep simply can’t happen without a sharp knife or two, not to mention a cheese grater or potato peeler — hence the packet of plastic bandages in every cook’s cabinet. In the event of a cut or abrasion, run plenty of tap water over the wound to rinse out dirt and bacteria — the source of infection — that may have been on the instrument or your skin. (Don’t use hydrogen peroxide: The solution kills contamination but can also destroy the clotting and healing cells the blood carries to the wound). Bleeding will likely stop on its own. If not, apply gentle but steady pressure to the cut with a clean cloth or bandage and keep the wound elevated. After bleeding stops, apply antibacterial ointment, and bandage the cut securely. Seek medical attention if the cut is deep, you can’t get dirt out of the wound or blood spurts from the wound or continues to flow after applying steady pressure for more than five to 10 minutes.

Watch out for swelling or redness. The wound could be infected. See a doctor as soon as possible.

2. Small Burns

We’ve all touched the back of our hand to an oven’s heating element, accidentally placed fingers near hot steam or been splattered with sizzling oil. If the burn covers the palm or crosses over a joint, seek immediate medical attention. The same holds if the burn — even a small one — is on the face. A trip to the doctor may help prevent scarring. Otherwise, you can treat it at home.

First, run the affected area under cool tap water for a few minutes to stop the burning process and remove any bits of burnt skin. Smooth on a layer of antibiotic ointment to create a barrier against infection and wrap loosely with gauze or a small bandage. Be sure to rinse the wound with water and change the dressing twice daily for a few days, says Avegno, so that it remains covered and protected until the scab is gone.

Watch out for increased pain, redness, fever, swelling or oozing. The burn could be infected. See a doctor as soon as possible.

3. Scalds

Burns from scalding water tend to cover larger areas, such as arms, feet, legs and stomach, which may make them harder to treat at home. And if the scalding is to a child, whereby a large percentage of the body is affected, call an ambulance or go to an emergency room immediately. Otherwise, start by treating the affected area the way you would a small burn: run under cool water (or use a wet towel) to stop the burning process and to clean the area, layer with antibiotic ointment, and dress with gauze or a large bandage as best you can. Even a clean and loose-fitting white T-shirt over the burn area will add some protection if you don’t have large enough bandages. Blistering is to be expected, but avoid popping the blisters, as doing so adds entry points for infection. These burns are often more painful than smaller ones, so take acetaminophen or ibuprofen. If that doesn’t block the pain, seek medical care.

Watch out for continued or worsening pain, or signs of infection (see above). In these cases, seek immediate medical attention.

4. Injuries to the Eyes

Lovers of spicy food know the painful power of capsicum, or cayenne pepper: Contact with the eyes causes a strong burning sensation. Flush out any material in the eye with water and then splash milk in the area to stop the burn. Steam, pokes to the eye or spattered oil are more serious and can cause eye damage. Rinse the eye right away to cool the area and clean out debris.

Watch out for pain, oozing or a change in vision after a few minutes of blinking and rinsing, any of which might indicate damage to the cornea. Seek immediate medical attention.

Given the increased risk of infection with cuts and burns, Avegno advises a tetanus shot if you haven’t had one in five to 10 years. Even a shot administered within a day or two after the injury will be effective, she says. Of course, when extreme injuries happen — especially when small children are involved — emergency care is critical for preventing even greater harm.




The Importance of Teaching Kids to Use 911

Last updated on June 27th, 2018 at 09:36 pm

Would your child know what to do in an emergency? Does your child know what is a real emergency (and what isn’t) and how to call 911?

9-1-1 for Kids 2Have you talked about and practiced how to handle a variety of emergency scenarios?

Kids as young as three years old can begin learning how and when to call 911 in the event of an emergency. Knowing what to teach kids about 911 is essential to ensure they use it properly and do not call 911 unnecessarily.

Here are some helpful tips for teaching the proper use of 911:

  1. Always teach your child the number is 9-1-1, not 9-11. You and I know there is not an “eleven” button on the phone, but young children do not and may waste valuable time trying to find the “eleven” button. Teach your child how to dial the phone using a play telephone or an unplugged or non-working phone. Do NOT actually call 911 while teaching your child. Pretend to be the dispatcher and ask what the emergency is and where. Coach your child on how to talk clearly and give the information necessary to help the dispatcher.
  2. The right time to call 911: Role-play different scenarios with your child, such as, “What would you do if the house was on fire?” or “What would you do if someone was very badly hurt or unconscious?” Talk about different types of emergencies and how to respond to them. It is also critical to teach kids never to call 911 as a joke or prank, and not to call for non-emergencies, as this can cause emergency responders to waste time that is needed for true emergencies elsewhere. In most cities, calling 911 as a joke is considered a crime and legal action may be taken. If you accidently dial 911, stay on the line and tell the operator that it was an accident. Do not hang up before telling the operator that it was a misdial, otherwise responders may be sent because they will assume there is an emergency. For non-emergency calls to the police or other authorities, post the non-emergency numbers near the phone.
  3. Call from a safe location: If the house is on fire, make sure your child understands that they need to go to a pre-determined meeting place or to a neighbor’s house before calling 911.
  4. Stay calm: It is easy to panic in an emergency. By practicing and discussing different types of emergencies, your child will be better prepared to stay calm and be able to talk to the dispatcher. Explain to your child that it is important to stay as calm as possible so they can give information to the 911 dispatcher and follow the dispatcher’s instructions.
  5. Give your name, address (or location if the emergency is not at home), and state the nature of the emergency: Kids need to know their name, address, and tell the dispatcher what is wrong so the dispatcher can determine which responders need to be sent. It is also a good idea to have your address posted near the phone, along with 911 and other emergency numbers.
  6. Do not hang up until the dispatcher tell you it is okay to hang up: Dispatchers are trained to stay on the line with callers, especially kids, to make sure the emergency responders arrive at the appropriate location and in case any thing changes with the situation that needs to be communicated to the responders.
  7. Check out the following resources for additional help with teaching kids how to use 911:
      • There is a great new educational DVD, “9-1-1: Getting Help is Easy”, starring Cell Phone Sally, which teaches life-saving 9-1-1 skills to kids ages 5-8 (but I think all ages can learn from and enjoy it). Check out the trailer and videos with your kids here:
      • http://www.youtube.com/user/CellPhoneSally911

Additional resources:

Sign Language for Emergency Situations: ASL, English & Spanish

Last updated on August 31st, 2015 at 12:26 am

It has been about two months since the first run of my newest video – Sign Language for Emergency Situations -ASL, English and Spanish appeared at my front door. I carefully opened the huge boxes and looked at the “zillion” copies that were all over my living room floor. How funny, that this little DVD carried so much history with it… none which is reflected on the DVD itself or its’ cover.

You see, I first decided to create this DVD on a date that will be easy to remember- September 11, 2001. It was a date in which many families, including mine, were intimately impacted by the days’ events. I had a brother and a cousin within sneezing distance of the World Trade Center that day. I had other relatives and numerous friends who all had Manhattan addresses. I also knew that many deaf individuals resided in NYC and wondered how terrified were they on that fateful and tragic day when communication was minimal at best and fear was at an all time high. In addition, my own family lives within a half hour to the nation’s capitol. Our local area, including our neighborhood, has dozens of families who work for government agencies, many of them deaf.

Sign language for emergenciesThat is the day I decided that I wanted to be part of the communication solution for those in the deaf community. I knew that my brother had benefited that day from the ability to ask questions of others that day as he walked the streets looking for a way to get home. He was able to assist others with the information he received and be a benefactor of the generosity of total strangers. He also could hear. But, what happened to the people who were not able to communicate during the flurry of madness on this unbelievable nightmare of a day? Pencil and paper was not practical when there was so much happening and the need for safety was tantamount. If only the emergency response workers knew simple signs such as – EVACUATE!, GO INDOORS, ARE YOU HURT?, WHO IS MISSING?, WHAT IS YOUR NAME? EXPLOSION! DO YOU NEED HELP?

It took me a long time to wrap my head around the events of 9/11. I know that I am not alone. But, then it came to me- I needed to develop something to help people who speak two of the four most common languages, other than English, in the United States to get assistance during natural disasters, medical crisis or if ever there was another 9/11! So, with help from my friends, especially Karina Prizont Cowan, I developed Sign Language for Emergency Situations with ASL and narration in Spanish and English. The entire DVD is signed and open captioned – for all to have access.

I started this journey by querying people who would be first to respond during an emergency. I went to fire stations throughout our local area and ask them what they would include. I asked emergency personnel such questions as – How much time would they dedicate to learning a new skill, such as basics of sign language and what they would want to add, if anything? I also talked to school nurses, health care providers within hospital settings (including pediatrics), educators, parents of special needs children and even people I “met” through social media. I made sure to include deaf people in my “focus” groups. Showing them list after list of vocabulary words and phrases. Finally, the final list was generated and a DVD was filmed. Afterwards, I showed it to many who helped with their initial input. Modifications were made to the video at the very strong request of First Responders who wanted it “short and sweet- 25 minutes or less!”. We also decided to add the Sign Language for Emergency Situations mini-chart that accompanies the DVD as an enclosure. The last piece prior to duplication was two super endorsements- Alison Rhodes the Safety Mom and Mackenzie Kelly of NORCAL Ambulance.

When the DVD was completed we put it up on YouTube and asked many people to “check it out”. The response was overwhelmingly positive. Then I began to think how can I get this to the people who it could benefit most. Twitter, Facebook, friends and good old word of mouth were very effective. Harris Communications- a large distributor of products for the deaf and hearing community who wish to learn ASL, etc. “hopped on board”. Hilary Bilbrey, owner of InspiredbyFamily.com and the creator of the Brecker Bunny Series took my DVD to a safety conference and was kind enough to give me feedback from the very people who I wanted to reach- emergency personnel!

Dozens of phone calls later I have talked to people from all over the country who wanted to know how to access the product, workshops and more. They are excited about the DVDs and the mini-chart for emergencies. They are thrilled that we have a unique product, which no one has encountered before, a TRILINGUAL emergency communication series with English, Spanish and ASL! Also, they like that our little company is accessible and affordable since so many areas have been hard hit financially.

I know that it has only been a very short while since those boxes appeared but I have booked guest speaking appearances to help train emergency personnel around the country. I am hoping this is only the beginning!

Healthful Hints:

Tips for getting started when learning American Sign Language (ASL):

  • Learning ASL can be loads of fun! Start with a few words at a time and practice with your family, friends, and co-workers to help your skills to improve quickly (and teach others!)
  • Parents should start with signs such as: MORE, HELP, FINISHED, BE CAREFUL with their children (depending on the age and developmental level of the child would determine where to start)
  • Also, knowing the letters of the alphabet and numbers 0-10 should be essential for beginners. Why? Because in a true emergency these would be the words most needed to help convey personal information and get an immediate response. If you can spell or read the ASL alphabet (known as the manual alphabet or fingerspelling) then you can convey any information to a deaf person who can “read ASL” and vice versa, such as names, email addresses, and phone numbers.
  • Children and adults with special learning challenges often need to sign adaptively. However, adults who live and work with these individuals should sign correctly. The same is true for parent of young children. “Baby sign babble” will give way to correct signing if the adults are good language models.

Signs for Emergency Situations

  • Knowing the Signs for CALL 9-1-1! HELP! PAIN, EVACUATE! could save LIVES!
  • If Emergency Responders, Law Enforcement officers, Health Care providers, School Nurses and Educators knew basic emergency ASL signs they could help communicate and facilitate assistance during natural disasters, acts of terrorism, emergency health care situations, or if a person is lost or has been abducted.
  • Non-emergency situations also can be a reason to learn sign language such as in the case of looking for a lost puppy or fixing a “boo-boo” that occurred on the school playground.

Enjoy your journey and let me know if I can help you along your way.