Help! My Son’s Stuffy Nose Doesn’t Care if It’s a Cold or Allergies

Last updated on August 30th, 2015 at 10:47 pm

colds and allergies mean miserable kidsHow can you help him breathe easier?

First, make sure your son is drinking throughout the day, since chugging liquids can thin mucus. Next, have him breathe in some steam to lubricate his nose and chest, which can unclog those passages. A few options:

Run a hot shower and have him sit in the bathroom with the door closed for 10 minutes.

Fill a bowl with hot water, add a few drops of eucalyptus oil, place a towel on top and waft the steam towards him. (Placing his head directly above the bowl without a towel may lead to burns.)

Run a humidifier in his room, especially while he sleeps.

If he’s still feeling stuffed up, try an over-the-counter saline spray to loosen the congestion and moisten nasal membranes.

Finally, be sure to keep a box of soft facial tissues on your nightstand. That way, relief will be within reach whenever he needs it.



Child Health & Safety News Roundup: 06-03-2013 to 06-09-2013

Last updated on March 2nd, 2018 at 04:13 pm

twitter thumbWelcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world.

Each day we use Twitter to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and other caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we may miss something, but we think overall we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. But for our friends and colleagues who are not on Twitter (or who are but may have missed something), we offer you a recap of the past week’s top 20 events & stories.

PedSafe Headline of the Week:

More kids being poisoned by parents’ prescription medications   http://t.co/1eoiB3bhZF   Parents be warned!

The Benefits of Volunteering as a Family

Last updated on June 7th, 2014 at 10:45 pm

Volunteer MatchLooking for ways to keep your kids busy and entertained during summer vacation? Consider volunteering as a family. There are many opportunities available for adults and kids to volunteer together to support a cause or make a difference in the lives of others.

Volunteerism has many benefits for families and especially for children. Spending time volunteering as a family promotes togetherness and family bonding as you all work towards a common goal. Through helping others, kids learn selflessness, compassion, empathy and responsibility. They may also learn more about the world around them and the rich diversity of our society. Volunteering can also teach new skills and give kids the opportunity to share their talents and abilities.

When my kids were younger, they enjoyed creating cards and pictures for hospice patients. A family friend is a hospice social worker and would deliver their creations to her patients. The patients loved them and it made them feel good that someone was thinking of them and cared about them in their time of need. My children felt good because they were bringing some joy into the life of someone who was in distress. My oldest also spent 3 years volunteering at a therapeutic horse riding facility that worked with children with disabilities and special needs. The experience of volunteering with these children inspired my child to learn sign language tovolunteer with kids better communicate with the children who were hearing impaired. It was an amazing experience that taught my child many lessons; such as, looking past disabilities to discover a person’s abilities, empathy, responsibility for the children and taking care of the horses, communication, teamwork, and much more. Our family has also enjoyed volunteering at a local food bank packing boxes for Christmas for children in third world countries. It was a good way for our kids to learn appreciation and gratitude for all the things in their lives they took for granted.

Volunteering can also be a therapeutic way to help children cope after a tragedy or disaster. Here in my home state of Oklahoma, we’ve been hit hard by several devastating tornadoes and severe storms in the past couple of weeks. The destruction and loss of life has left many feeling anxious, sad, and helpless. I was feeling that way myself and it helped me greatly to go volunteer to help victims. While children may not be able to help with clean up efforts after a natural disaster, they can volunteer in many other ways. For example, a preteen girl in Tulsa has partnered with Build-a-Bear to raise funds to give bears to children whose homes were destroyed. Some young girls had a lemonade stand to raise money for storm victims. A teenage boy has started a book drive for the two elementary schools that were hit by the Moore, Oklahoma tornado. These are just a few ways kids are getting involved and volunteering their time and abilities to help. Volunteering can help kids feel less anxious and give them a sense of empowerment and community in times of tragedy. It can also help them learn what happened and show them how people come together in times of trouble to care for each other, which may offer them some reassurance and comfort.

I was asked last week to speak on this topic on Fox 23’s Great Day Green Country show in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Here I share more tips for volunteering as a family:

If you want to volunteer as a family in your area but aren’t sure where to start, check out VolunteerMatch.org for opportunities for all ages.

Is One Type of Floss More Effective For My Kids Than Another??

Last updated on August 30th, 2015 at 11:54 pm

Floss for a  lifetime of healthy teethWith so many types of floss out there, it can be confusing to figure out which is best for your family. Personal preference is most important: The best dental floss is the one they’ll use (and use correctly) on a daily basis. Plaque — or biofilm, as we’re calling it these days — needs to be removed every 24 hours, before it has a chance to cause tooth decay or gum disease.

My advice is to experiment. Some find waxed floss easier to use, while others like the unwaxed variety or dental tape, which is flatter and wider. Your kids may prefer a particular flavor, such as mint or cinnamon. If their teeth are very close together, a fine or extra-fine floss might feel best. But if there’s any shredding, try another kind.

Still not sure? At your next cleaning, ask the dental hygienist for recommendations based on your family’s oral history.



Child Health & Safety News Roundup: 05-27-2013 to 06-02-2013

Last updated on March 2nd, 2018 at 04:13 pm

twitter thumbWelcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world.

Each day we use Twitter to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and other caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we may miss something, but we think overall we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. But for our friends and colleagues who are not on Twitter (or who are but may have missed something), we offer you a recap of the past week’s top 25 events & stories.

PedSafe Headline of the Week:

Tips for how to safely use baby products and equipment – from the JPMA   http://t.co/McKp0RceqH … a MUST READ for new parents