Video: Is Your Child’s Rash Fifth Disease and Should You Worry?

Last updated on May 1st, 2017 at 07:58 pm

In this video Dr. Rob Hicks, a general practitioner (GP) or family physician, briefly describes Fifth Disease or “Slapped Cheek Syndrome,” and how you can tell this rash apart from other more concerning illnesses.

Editor’s Note: Video Highlights

  • child-fifth diseaseFifth Disease – or “slapped cheek syndrome” is a viral infection, caused by the virus, parvovirus B19
  • It is spread in the air when we cough or laugh, when we sneeze, or in saliva and air droplets when we’re in close contact
  • It is most commonly children who get it – usually between the age of four and 12 – and can spread very rapidly throughout a classroom or school
  • The symptoms to look out for are generally those of a common cold,so sneezing, runny nose, sore throat, headache, fever.
  • But the characteristic of this infection is the rash – the blotchy red rash on one or both cheeks that gives the slapped cheek appearance
  • The rash can remain on the face, but could spread to the rest of the body,including the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet
  • Generally, it’s not painful but it might be irritating for some
  • Unlike the worrying rash of meningitis, if you press this rash it will fade
  • Symptoms are often mild and parents should follow the usual management of any viral infection,
    • Plenty of rest and plenty of fluids
    • For sore throats or a high temperature children’s paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen is perfectly reasonable
  • If you’re not sure have a word with a pharmacist or with your doctor
  • The people who need to be concerned are pregnant women – if you get the infection in early pregnancy and you’ve not had it before it can increase the risk of miscarriage





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About the Author

NHS Choices (www.nhs.uk) is the UK’s biggest health website. It provides a comprehensive health information service to help put you in control of your healthcare.

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