Can I Get Pregnant Right After My Period? Teens Need to Know

Yes, although it is not very likely. If you have sex without using contraception, you can conceive (get pregnant) at any time during your menstrual cycle, even during, or just after, your period.

You can also get pregnant if you have never had a period before, during your first period, or after the first time you have sex.

There is no “safe” time of the month, when you can have sex without contraception and not risk becoming pregnant. However, there are times in your menstrual cycle when you are at your most fertile, and this is when you are most likely to conceive.

Understanding your menstrual cycle

Your menstrual cycle begins on the first day of your period and continues up to the first day of your next period. You are most fertile at the time of ovulation, (when an egg is released from your ovaries) which usually occurs 12-14 days before your next period starts. This is the time of the month when you are most likely to get pregnant.

It is unlikely that you will get pregnant just after your period, although it can happen. It is important to remember that sperm can sometimes survive in the body for up to seven days after you have sex. This means that it may be possible to get pregnant soon after your period finishes if you ovulate early, especially if you have a naturally short menstrual cycle.

You should always use contraception when you have sex, if you do not want to become pregnant.

Further information:

NHS Choices logo


From www.nhs.uk





Child Health & Safety News 5/14: Trump Requests $7B CHIP Cut

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: FDA expands approval of Gilenya as treament for multiple sclerosis specifically for adolescent and pediatric patients bit.ly/2Iama1n 

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 15 events & stories.

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
Trump asks Congress to cut $7 billion from child health insurance; locals say No bit.ly/2IxEjFZ

  • Tomorrow morning, Avengers: Infinity War is Sensory Friendly at AMC bit.ly/2jgRIUn 2018-5-11
  • Concerned about your kids having dental x-rays? Thurs Time Capsule 06/11 bit.ly/2rA0GzM 2018-5-10
  • When trauma is passed from Holocaust victims to children bit.ly/2IpTmkI 2018-5-09
  • Melania Trump Announces Her Official First Lady Initiative Called ‘Be Best’ ti.me/2Ip5J0A – “Be Best” at educating our children about the importance of a healthy and balanced life 2018-5-09
  • 15 Things Teens Should Know About Sex: Q&A bit.ly/2K6UZRI 2018-5-09
  • Climate Change and It’s Impact on Global Child Health – an Overview by the American Academy of Pediatrics bit.ly/2I3BKI3 2018-5-08
  • The Stricter a State’s Gun Laws, the Fewer Children Die From Guns, Study Finds bit.ly/2jGDAUX 2018-5-08
  • Who Here Is Certified in CPR or Basic First Aid? Ask The School!! bit.ly/2I1Zsod 2018-5-07
  • Depression among parents of newborns can persist 6 months after NICU discharge bit.ly/2HS8ubr Parental age, education and # of kids can influence risk 2018-5-07

What Are The Benefits Of A Well Child Exam?

When you child is acting sick or unusual you are right on top of that and many times that ends in a visit to his/her Pediatrician.  Your mind is put at ease (usually), your child may or may not be given medication for the problem, you go home feeling much better about your responsibilities as a parent, and within a short period of time your child is feeling better.  But what about all the well child/baby exams that are scheduled for regular intervals: are they really that important?  After all they are inconvenient, cost you money and often times you leave your Pediatricians office with information that you knew all the time; your child is healthy.

But what if you were not capable of determining the status of your child’s health; not out of lack of trying or intelligence, but a lack of familiarity with the normal course of things that should take place in your child’s development and growth.  In other words, how do you know what you don’t know? Always a difficult question to answer about any issue.  In this case there is someone readily available who has had many years of training in order to identify the abnormal among the myriad of normal processes going on at the same time in your child.  Not only that but he/she has had the opportunity through many years of practice and observation as a Pediatrician to help identify the subtle factors that many might miss leading one to feel there is a problem there.  He/she can then explain in everyday language what the issue is and what can be done about it.

Your Pediatrician is the best source of information about your child and how he/she fits into or out of “normal”.   Let’s take, for instance, a major reason for well- baby/child exams, growth and development.  You can immediately notice symptoms of a cold with runny nose, cough sneezing and possible some fever, but what do you look for to tell you there is slow down in development or growth? By the time you (as a parent) will notice such subtle issues, these might have been going on for some time, and the first reaction in parents to seeing these is to deny their existence- “not in my child”.  This can result in weeks or months of delay in recognition and treatment.  Sure you can read everything you come across about childhood growth and development and sure you will begin to pick up the most obvious factors but nothing substitutes for the knowledge your Doctor already has.  Not only able to pick up these issues early but to possibly set your mind at ease about things you have noticed and worried about that are really insignificant.  He will also keep an exact record of growth in your child to include height, weight, and head circumference (in babies) in order to spot early issues.

There are psychological and behavioral abnormalities that can be seen early in life that can begin to formulate a plan of action as your child grows older and bigger. An observation of family/, and child/physician interaction, can become very important to the trained eye as to “normal” vs out of the range of normal of a child.

Then there is the entire issue of protecting your child from injury and disease through the one on one counseling taking place in the office and the very important use of vaccines as directed by knowledgeable organizations such as American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC in Atlanta.  All the vaccines recommended have been tested and retested over a matter of many years before being released for use in children.

As you can seed there are a huge variety of reasons why your child should not miss  his/her regular well-child/baby exams, so try to stick with the schedule that is advised by your Pediatrician

The Instability of the “Dreamers'” Future Hurts All Children

If you follow the news at all, I’m sure you’ve heard about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. To summarize it, it is a program that has kept around 690,000 young, illegal immigrants from being deported. It was put into place by the Obama administration in 2012 after numerous attempts by Congress to come up with a permanent solution for “Dreamers” failed. The DACA provides children who were brought into the United States illegally, as minors, the ability to work and go to school without fear of deportation.

Many of these children grow up without having any idea of what their legal status is or what being illegal means. Now, they are facing a very uncertain future, especially those who plan to go to college. However, what I really want to address here is why the debate over what to do with Dreamers matters to us as guardians of young people.

When we choose to take responsibility for a child or teenager, even to the smallest degree, we are choosing to also have a direct impact on the future of our society. Culture affects young people differently than it does adults. As adults, we have, in many cases, been given the resources and experiences to learn which aspects of our culture we agree with and which we do not. We then build up a worldview that we protect and that protects our sense of self.

Children do not have this yet. They are still sorting through their understanding of the world and learning their emotions. It is up to us to guide them along that path. This brings me back to the debate over the DACA. Social environments have distinct impacts on child and adolescent development. Children must be able to have faith in the structures of authority that surround them. These structures are supposed to provide them with the safe space they need to develop as human beings. When these structures show themselves as unstable it has far reaching psychological effects not just for the children directly involved, but also for the rest of the population.

Uncertainty and fear can cripple the human mind, especially the tender developing mind of a child or teenager that is particularly vulnerable to stress. Many of these children who are now facing an uncertain future want to pursue higher education. Putting their futures in jeopardy hurts them as individuals and through their struggles their friends and their friends friends will lose faith in a system that is already on shaky ground. The ripple effect of this kind of uncertainty is sure to have lasting repercussions past what we can see.

As these uncertainties become more apparent, it falls on us as caretakers, to work even harder than we do already to provide a stable and healthy environment for our children and the children around us to grow in. We must listen to their needs and support them, as individuals, and as a whole as we strive towards a better future for all.

Children Learn What They Live

by Dorothy Law Nolte

If children live with criticism,

They learn to condemn.

If children live with hostility,

They learn to fight.

If children live with ridicule,

They learn to be shy.

If children live with shame,

They learn to feel guilty.

If children live with encouragement,

They learn confidence.

If children live with tolerance,

They learn to be patient.

If children live with praise,

They learn to appreciate.

If children live with acceptance,

They learn to love.

If children live with approval,

They learn to like themselves.

If children live with honesty,

They learn truthfulness.

If children live with security,

They learn to have faith in themselves and others.

If children live with friendliness,

They learn the world is a nice place in which to live.

(Copyright © 1972/1975 by Dorothy Law Nolte)

15 Things Teens Should Know About Sex: Q&A

There are so many stories around sex, it’s hard to know what to believe. Find out the facts – it’s the best way to make sure you have safer sex.

1: Can you get pregnant the first time you have sex?

Yes, pregnancy is possible even if it is the first time a girl has had sex. The truth is, if a boy and a girl have sex and don’t use contraception, she can get pregnant, whether it’s her first time or she has had sex lots of times.

A boy can get a girl pregnant the first time he has sex with her. If you’re female and have sex, you can get pregnant as soon as you start ovulating (releasing eggs). This happens before you have your first period. Read more about periods and the menstrual cycle.

Using contraception protects against pregnancy. Using condoms as well also protects against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Before you have sex, talk to your partner about contraception, and make sure you’ve got some. Find out about getting contraception and tips on using condoms.

2: Can you get pregnant if a boy withdraws (pulls out) before he comes?

Yes, you can. There’s a myth that a girl can’t get pregnant if a boy withdraws his penis before he ejaculates (comes). The truth is, pulling out the penis won’t stop a girl from getting pregnant.

Before a boy ejaculates, there’s sperm in the pre-ejaculatory fluid (pre-come), which leaks out when he gets excited. It only takes one sperm to get a girl pregnant. Pre-come can contain STIs, so withdrawing the penis won’t prevent you from getting an infection.

If a boy says he’ll take care to withdraw before he ejaculates, don’t believe him. Nobody can stop themselves from leaking sperm before they come. Always use a condom to protect yourself against STIs, and also use other contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

3: Can you get pregnant if you have sex during your period?

Yes, a girl can get pregnant during her period. The truth is, she can get pregnant at any time of the month if she has sex without contraception.

Sperm can survive for several days after sex, so even if you do it during your period, sperm can stay in the body long enough to get you pregnant.

4: Can you get pregnant if you have sex standing up?

Yes, a girl can become pregnant in any position that she has sex. It is a myth that a girl can’t get pregnant if she has sex standing up, sitting down, or if she jumps up and down afterwards. The truth is, there’s no such thing as a “safe” position if you’re having sex without a condom or another form of contraception.

There are also no “safe” places to have sex, including the bath or shower. Pregnancy can happen whatever position you do it in, and wherever you do it. All that’s needed is for a sperm to meet an egg.

5: Can you get pregnant from oral sex?

No, you can’t get pregnant following oral sex. The truth is, a girl can’t get pregnant this way, even if she swallows sperm. But you can catch STIs through oral sex, including gonorrhoeachlamydia and herpes. It’s safer to use a condom on a penis if you have oral sex.

6: Does alcohol make you better in bed?

No, alcohol does not make you better in bed. The truth is, when you’re drunk it’s hard to make smart decisions. Alcohol can make you take risks, such as having sex before you’re ready, or having sex with someone you don’t like. Drinking won’t make the experience better. You’re more likely to regret having sex if you do it when you’re drunk. Find out more about sex and alcohol.

7: Can you use clingfilm as a condom?

No, you cannot use clingfilm, or a plastic bag or a crisp packet instead of a condom. Only a condom can protect against STIs.

You can get condoms free from:

  • community contraceptive clinics
  • sexual health and genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics
  • some young persons services

You can also buy them from pharmacies and shops. Make sure they have the CE mark or BSI kite mark on them, as this means they’ve been tested to high safety standards. Find (UK) sexual health services near you**, including contraception clinics.

8: Will a boy’s balls explode if he doesn’t have sex?

No, this is not true. Not having sex doesn’t harm boys or girls, and a boy’s balls will not explode.

Boys and men produce sperm all the time. If they don’t ejaculate, the sperm is absorbed into their body. Ejaculation can happen if they masturbate or have a wet dream. They don’t have to have sex. Find out about boys’ bodies.

9: Can you wash condoms and use them again?

No, condoms should only be used once. Don’t believe anyone who says that you can wash condoms and use them again. If you’ve used a condom, throw it away and use a new one if you have sex again.

This is true for male condoms and female condoms. Condoms need to be changed after 30 minutes of sex because friction can weaken the condom, making it more likely to break or fail. Get tips on using condoms.

10: Can you get pregnant if you have sex only once?

Yes, it is possible to get pregnant even if you only have sex once. You may have heard the myth that you have to have sex lots of times to get pregnant. The truth is, all it takes is for one sperm to meet an egg. To avoid pregnancy, always use contraception, and use a condom to protect against STIs.

11: Do you always get symptoms if you have an STI?

No, you might not know if you have an STI due to signs such as it hurting when you pee, or noticing a discharge, unusual smell or soreness.

Many people don’t notice signs of infection, so you won’t always know if you’re infected. You can’t tell by looking at someone whether they’ve got an STI. If you’re worried that you’ve caught an STI, visit your GP (*physician) or local sexual health clinic. Check-ups and tests for STIs are free and confidential, including for under-16s. Find sexual health services near you**.

12: Can women who have sex with women get STIs?

Yes, women who sleep with women can get or pass on STIs. If a woman has an STI, the infection can be passed on through vaginal fluid (including fluid on shared sex toys), blood or close bodily contact.

Always use a new condom on shared sex toys. If a woman is also having sex with a man, using contraception and condoms will help to prevent STIs and unintended pregnancy.

13: Do all gay men have anal sex?

No, this isn’t true. Anal sex, like any sexual activity, is a matter of preference. Some people choose to do it as part of their sex life and some don’t, whether they’re gay, straight, lesbian or bisexual.

According to the Third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (published in 2013), 18.5% of men and 17% of women in the 16-24 age group had had anal sex in the previous year. Whatever kind of sex you have, use a condom to protect yourself and your partner against STIs. However, having sex isn’t the only way to show your feelings for someone.

14: Does starting her periods mean a girl is ready to have sex?

No, this isn’t true. Starting your periods means that you’re growing up, and that you could get pregnant if you were to have sex. It doesn’t mean that you’re ready to have sex, or that you should be sexually active.

People feel ready to have sex at different times. It’s a personal decision. Most young people in England wait until they’re 16 or older before they start having sex. Find out more about periods and the menstrual cycle.

15: Can I get help and information on sex if I need it?

If you want to talk to someone in confidence, you can call the national sexual health helpline on 0300 123 7123*.

Find U.K. sexual health services near you**.

To find your nearest young people’s service, visit the Ask Brook website.

Find out where to get help when sex goes wrong.

Condom, no condom? is an interactive video on YouTube where you decide what happens. Just choose which button to click at the end of each section to continue the story, and see the consequences of your choices.

Editor’s Note:  

* Clarification Provided for our U.S. Readers

** Resources Outside the UK:

NHS Choices logo


From www.nhs.uk





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Child Health & Safety News 5/7: Bus Transport -Special Needs Kids

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: How to Talk to Young Kids About School Safety — Even If You Think It’s Too Early to Start http://bit.ly/2I2Eg5G

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 15 events & stories.

  • Few transgender teens and parents willing to delay hormone therapy to preserve fertility bit.ly/2HVK0xN  2018-5-06
  • Should I Let My Kids Win or Play to Win? bit.ly/2HPVoLv 2018-5-06
  • How Parents Can Take Their Little One Camping bit.ly/2HYyhKO 2018-5-06
  • Nurse behind hilarious flu video talks about life on the job on.today.com/2jv8C1O, 2018-5-05

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
School Bus Transportation of Children With Special Health Care Needs- and In-Depth Look by AAP   http://bit.ly/2wlnU2l 

  • Child mortality rate ‘50% higher in England than in Sweden’ bit.ly/2jxrsFC 2018-5-05
  • Here’s How Instagram Will Use AI To Take On Its Bullying Problem bit.ly/2FFPxCS 2018-5-04
  • Why Social Skills Matter to Kid’s Academics bit.ly/2FHCJf0 2018-5-04
  • 5 Simple Steps Teach Your Child Friendship Skills for Life – Thurs Time Capsule -06/11 bit.ly/2jjrAZb 2018-5-03
  • The Easiest Way To Limit Screen Time {We’ve found it!} bit.ly/2HPy4g5 2018-5-02
  • Emotional intelligence: Why Low-Tech Skills Will be the Key to Success in a High-Tech World bit.ly/2FyKow1 2018-5-02
  • AU. Parents clueless about depths of teens’ ‘confronting’ internet behaviour, survey finds ab.co/2KtHrAW 2018-5-02
  • 4 things you need to know about car seat safety bit.ly/2KoQHpI 2018-5-01
  • Can My Child Be In Charge of The Family Dog? bit.ly/2HprjlK 2018-4-30