Saturday, AMC Has a Sensory Friendly Screening of Incredibles 2

Last updated on July 15th, 2018 at 07:33 pm

New sensory friendly logoSince 2007, AMC Entertainment (AMC) and the Autism Society have teamed up to bring families affected by autism and other special needs “Sensory Friendly Films” every month – a wonderful opportunity to enjoy fun new films in a safe and accepting environment. Tomorrow, Incredibles 2 is Sensory Friendly at AMC.

The movie auditoriums will have their lights turned up and the sound turned down. Families will be able to bring in snacks to match their child’s dietary needs (i.e. gluten-free, casein-free, etc.), there are no advertisements or previews before the movie and it’s totally acceptable to get up and dance, walk, shout, talk to each other…and even sing – in other words, AMC’s “Silence is Golden®” policy will not be enforced during movie screenings unless the safety of the audience is questioned.

Does it make a difference? Absolutely! Imagine …no need to shhhhh your child. No angry stares from other movie goers. Many parents think twice before bringing a child to a movie theater. Add to that your child’s special needs and it can easily become cause for parental panic. But on this one day a month, for this one screening, everyone is there to relax and have a good time, everyone expects to be surrounded by kids – with and without special needs – and the movie theater policy becomes “Tolerance is Golden“.

Families affected by autism or other special needs can view a sensory friendly screening of Incredibles 2 on Saturday, June 23rd at 10am (local time). Tickets are typically $4 to $6 depending on the location. To find a theatre near you, here is a list of AMC theatres nationwide participating in this fabulous program (note: to access full list, please scroll to the bottom of the page).

Still to Come in June: Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (Tues 5/26)

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Editor’s note: Although Incredibles 2 has been chosen by the AMC and the Autism Society as this month’s Sensory Friendly Film, we do want parents to know that it is rated PG by the Motion Picture Association of America for action sequences and some brief mild language.  As always, please check the IMDB Parents Guide for a more detailed description of this film to determine if it is right for you and your family.

How Can I Avoid Food Poisoning During Pregnancy?

Last updated on June 22nd, 2018 at 01:48 am

You can avoid food poisoning during pregnancy by:

  • not eating some foods – see foods to avoid during pregnancy
  • washing your hands before handling food
  • thoroughly washing all fruit and vegetables, including prepared salads, before eating
  • washing your hands, all surfaces and utensils after preparing raw meat
  • thoroughly cooking raw meat so there is no trace of pink or blood
  • heating ready meals (*pre-packaged meals) until they are piping hot all the way through – this is especially important for meals containing poultry
  • keeping leftovers covered in the fridge and using them within 2 days
  • eating food before it has passed its “use by” date
  • preventing cross-contamination (when harmful bacteria is spread between food, surfaces and equipment)

There are several types of bacteria that can cause food poisoning. These include:

  • salmonella
  • campylobacter
  • listeria

Salmonella

Salmonella is found in:

  • raw meat and poultry
  • unpasteurised milk
  • raw eggs and raw egg products

Although salmonella food poisoning is unlikely to harm your baby, it can cause severe diarrhoea and vomiting.

To reduce your risk of salmonella infection:

  • choose British Lion Code of Practice eggs (in the UK) if you want to have raw or partially cooked eggs – these eggs have a red lion logo stamped on their shell and are considered safe to eat runny
  • avoid raw or partially cooked eggs that are not part of the lion code, and avoid food that may contain them, such as homemade mayonnaise – cook these eggs until the whites and yolks are solid
  • avoid raw or partially cooked meat, especially poultry

Campylobacter

Campylobacter is found in:

  • raw and undercooked meat, especially poultry
  • unpasteurised milk
  • untreated water

You can reduce your risk of campylobacter infection by:

  • washing your hands thoroughly before preparing and eating food, and after handling raw food
  • not washing raw poultry
  • keeping cooked food away from raw food
  • cooking food thoroughly, especially meat and poultry, so it’s piping hot
  • keeping all kitchen surfaces and equipment clean, such as chopping boards and dish cloths
  • not drinking untreated water from lakes, rivers or streams

Listeria

Listeria can cause an infection called listeriosis. Although the infection is rare, even a mild form of listeriosis in a pregnant woman can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth or severe illness in newborn babies.

Listeria can be found in unpasteurised milk and in many chilled foods, including:

  • pâté
  • mould-ripened soft cheeses and soft blue-veined cheeses
  • cooked sliced meats
  • smoked salmon

You can reduce your risk of listeriosis by:

  • not eating certain foods while pregnant, such as some soft cheeses and all types of pâté – see foods to avoid during pregnancy
  • not drinking unpasteurised milk – only drink pasteurised or UHT milk
  • heating ready meals or reheated food until they’re piping hot all the way through
  • making sure your fridge is set at 5C or below and working correctly
  • not using food after its “use by” date

Read the answers to more questions about pregnancy.

Further information:

 

Editor’s Note:  

* Clarification Provided for our U.S. Readers

NHS Choices logo


From www.nhs.uk





Child Health & Safety News 6/18: First Child Seat with Airbags

Last updated on July 15th, 2018 at 07:35 pm

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: “What to do if your child’s nude selfie goes viral” bit.ly/2sYtrHm 

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • How to talk to your child about thunderstorm anxiety bit.ly/2lfLKV6 2018-6-17
  • Before pre-k: Earliest months shape children’s lives bit.ly/2teXY3T 2018-6-17
  • The Dangers Of Pushing Kids Too Hard, And How Parents Can Learn To Back Off n.pr/2ld6o80 2018-6-17
  • Safety in Seconds: 30 second water safety video  with reminders to help parents keep kids safe around pools  bit.ly/2JXwu9K  2018-6-17
  • Kids can suffer permanent damage from border separations – trauma can damage both the brain and the body doctors say nbcnews.to/2lapETQ 2018-6-17
  • High school students are having less sex and they’re also less likely to take drugs since they’re spending more time on their cell phones….unfortunately, they’re also more likely to have felt bullied and suicidal  bit.ly/2le1S9k 2018-6-16

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
First child car seat with airbags launched in UAE  bit.ly/2MenTBj
The airbags reduce the forces on a child’s neck up to 55% compared to a standard forward facing child car seat

  • Effective Treatment of Pediatric Eating Disorders bit.ly/2t02EuY 2018-6-16
  • Mom Calls Out United Airlines For Putting Baby In Danger by Requiring FAA Approved Car Seat to Be Secured Forward Facing bit.ly/2t3qoOT 2018-6-16
  • 9 Ways Social Media Has Affected the Way We Parent bit.ly/2tacQ3l 2018-6-15
  • AAP a leading voice against separating children, parents at border bit.ly/2l7xxt4 Over 2 weeks 658 children were separated from their parents at the border, according to recent data from the US Customs & Border Protection 2018-6-15
  • The Plague Just Showed Up in Idaho for the First Time in 25 Years—Should You Be Worried? bit.ly/2MpNIOO 2018-6-15
  • 9 Ways to Help Your Children Cope with Painful Emotions bit.ly/2sKKTQg 2018-6-15
  • Is Your Tween (Illegally) on Facebook? Thurs Time Capsule 06/11 bit.ly/2xXzaCX 2018-6-14
  • How to keep your child safe in the summer heat bit.ly/2JMBLRt 2018-6-14
  • How to Teach Kids How to Solve Their Own Problems bit.ly/2t4wEVL 2018-6-13
  • Mirror, Mirror on the Wall – The Kid I See Is Not Me At All – Body Dysmorphic Disorder bit.ly/2y2dlSK  2018-6-13
  • Here’s What Happens When You Combine a Day Care and a Nursing Home bit.ly/2Lz5BJR 2018-6-11
  • Closing of oil and coal power plants linked to sizable drop in preterm births among women living nearby bit.ly/2Mf244C Women living within 3 miles showed the biggest drop after a closure 2018-6-11
  • Do I Want My Dog to be Protective of My Child? bit.ly/2JhKDyo 2018-6-11

 

Personal WaterCraft & Kids: How to Make Them Fun AND Safe!

Last updated on July 15th, 2018 at 07:35 pm

Watercraft familySummer is fast approaching and that means that thousands of children will be hitting the water looking to go fast! Summer is the time to think about the beach and being outside and speeding around oceans, lakes or canals in PWC or personal watercrafts. PWC have steadily risen in ownership in the U.S to well over a million and with that increase in ownership come’s an increase in operators and injuries to the tune of over 12,000 documented injuries annually. Most injuries seem to occur when PWC collide—either with other vessels including other PWC or with fixed objects such as docks or tree stumps. Behavioral factors cited in 3 studies include operator inexperience (most operators had <20 hours of experience in boat operation), operator inattention, and excess speed or reckless operation. Some PWC can seat as many as 3 people and hit speeds of 60 mph. PWC are the only recreational boats for which the leading cause of death is not drowning; most fatalities result from blunt trauma.

The answer to the question of how to keep our children safe on the water seems to be the same as it has been for quite some time. Education and hands on practice. We need to educate our children and ourselves on water safety, both in and out of the water and both for operating and riding on a PWC. The Personal Watercraft Industry Association has the following recommendations:

RECOMMENDATIONS

  1. No one younger than 16 years should operate PWC.
  2. The operator and every passenger must wear a US Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device.
  3. Alcohol or other drug use should be avoided before and while operating PWC.
  4. Participation in a safe boater course with specific information about PWC should be required before operating PWC.
  5. Safe operating practices, such as no operation between sunset and sunrise, no wake jumping, and observing posted speed limits or no-wake zones, should be followed. (No-wake zone means the craft speed is slow enough that no wake is formed behind the craft as it crosses a specific area.)
  6. PWC should not be operated where swimmers are in the water.
  7. If a PWC is being used to tow another person on skis, knee boards, tubes, or other devices, a second person must face the rear to monitor the person being towed.
  8. All persons who rent PWC should be required to comply with these recommendations.
  9. Protective equipment such as wet suits, gloves, boots, eyewear, and helmets may be appropriate to wear.

When it comes to PWC, owning and operating a PWC is the same as owning and operating a car and should be treated with the same amount of respect. Would you hand over your car keys to your child who has little to no driver training? Of course not and the same should hold true when it comes to any PWC. The numbers don’t lie. Everyone needs PWC drivers Ed. Putting in the time before hand will save a lot of pain and suffering during what should be the most fun time of the year for kids.

Thank you and be safe

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Editor’s Note:  This post first appeared on Pediatric Safety in April 2013. We thought now might be a good time to revisit it. 

9 Ways to Help Your Children Cope with Painful Emotions

Last updated on June 22nd, 2018 at 01:48 am

The social-emotional development of our nation’s children is foremost in our minds. We have all hugged our children and expressed gratitude for their health and well-being. We pray for those families who now are hurting so deeply. Some of whom are very close to our own hearts.

When life is difficult or complicated and our children are in a stress-response, we need to co-regulate with them. Our words and actions can help the children “Find Calm”.  What we say, think and do in these intense or painful moment matters.

Co-regulating is about being present and ready to sit with the child in their fear, hurt or pain. Here are 9 ways you can say, “Your feelings matter”.  “Together, we will get through this.”  Feel free to grab these mantras if one rings true for you. Let us share some love and kindness when moments get tough.

  • “We can embrace your BIG feelings. Let’s breathe through them together”
  • “Let’s move through your BIG feelings together
  • “Your feelings truly matter to me”
  • Let’s choose how many minutes you will be in these BIG feelings.”
  • “You have the power to feel deeply and still be balanced and calm.”
  • “Help me better understand how you feel.”
  • “Let’s Be Calm Together.”
  • “I am right here with you.  We will work through this together.”
  • “We can work through these intense feelings together.”

 

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bloom cover - 140x208Written for real parents with anxious, angry and over-the-top kids, Bloom is a brain-based approach to parenting all children. Taking its lead from neuroscience and best practices in early childhood mental health, it offers parents, teachers and care providers the words, thoughts and actions to raise calm, confident children, while reducing the need for consequences and punishment. The first book of its kind, it provides pages full of printable mantras you can carry with you, hang on your fridge or use in your classroom to raise emotionally competent kids. Stop second-guessing the way you handle misbehaviors, and learn why they occur in the first place. Bloom is available at amazon.com

 

 

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall – The Kid I See Is Not Me At All

Last updated on July 15th, 2018 at 07:36 pm

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), or body dysmorphia, is a mental health condition where a person spends a lot of time worrying about flaws in their appearance. These flaws are often unnoticeable to others.
People of any age can have BDD, but it is most common in teenagers and young adults. It affects both men and women. Having BDD does not mean you are vain or self-obsessed. It can be very upsetting and have a big impact on your life.

Symptoms of BDD

You might have BDD if you:

  • worry a lot about a specific area of your body (particularly your face)
  • spend a lot of time comparing your looks with other people’s
  • look at yourself in mirrors a lot or avoid mirrors altogether
  • go to a lot of effort to conceal flaws – for example, by spending a long time combing your hair, applying make-up or choosing clothes
  • pick at your skin to make it “smooth”

BDD can seriously affect your daily life, including your work, social life and relationships. BDD can also lead to depressionself-harm and even thoughts of suicide.

Getting help for BDD

You should visit your GP (*doctor) if you think you might have BDD.

They will probably ask a number of questions about your symptoms and how they affect your life. They may also ask if you have had any thoughts about harming yourself.

Your GP may refer you to a mental health specialist for further assessment and treatment, or you may be treated through your GP.

It can be very difficult to seek help for BDD, but it’s important to remember that you have nothing to feel ashamed or embarrassed about. Seeking help is important because your symptoms probably won’t go away without treatment and may get worse.

Treatments for BDD

The symptoms of BDD can get better with treatment.

  • if you have relatively mild symptoms of BDD you should be referred for a type of talking therapy called cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), which you have either on your own or in a group
  • if you have moderate symptoms of BDD you should be offered either CBT or a type of antidepressant medication called a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)
  • if you have more severe symptoms of BDD, or other treatments don’t work, you should be offered CBT together with an SSRI

1. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)

CBT can help you manage your BDD symptoms by changing the way you think and behave. It helps you learn what triggers your symptoms, and teaches you different ways of thinking about and dealing with your habits. You and your therapist will agree on goals for the therapy and work together to try to reach them.

CBT for treating BDD will usually include a technique known as exposure and response prevention (ERP). This involves gradually facing situations that would normally make you think obsessively about your appearance and feel anxious. Your therapist will help you to find other ways of dealing with your feelings in these situations so that, over time, you become able to deal with them without feeling self-conscious or afraid.

You may also be given some self-help information to read at home and your CBT might involve group work, depending on your symptoms.

CBT for children and young people will usually also involve their family members or carers.

2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)

SSRIs are a type of antidepressant. There are a number of different SSRIs, but the one most commonly used to treat BDD is called fluoxetine.

It may take up to 12 weeks for SSRIs to have an effect on your BDD symptoms. If they work for you, you will probably be asked to keep taking them for several months to improve your symptoms further and stop them coming back.

There are some common side effects of taking SSRIs, but these will often pass within a few weeks. Your doctor will keep a close eye on you over the first few weeks. It’s important to tell them if you’re feeling particularly anxious or emotional, or are having thoughts of harming yourself.

If you are no longer having any symptoms, you will probably be taken off SSRIs. This will be done by slowly reducing your dose over time to help make sure your symptoms don’t come back (relapse) and to avoid any side effects of coming off the drug (withdrawal symptoms), such as anxiety.

Adults younger than 30 will need to be carefully monitored when taking SSRIs as they may have a higher chance of developing suicidal thoughts or trying to hurt themselves in the early stages of treatment.

Children and young people may be offered an SSRI if they are having severe symptoms of BDD. Medication should only be suggested after they have seen a psychiatrist and been offered therapy.

3. Further treatment

If treatment with both CBT and an SSRI has not improved your BDD symptoms after 12 weeks, you may be prescribed a different type of SSRI or another antidepressant called clomipramine.

If you don’t see any improvements in your symptoms, you may be referred to a mental health clinic or hospital that specialises in BDD, such as the National OCD/BDD Service in London**.

These services will probably do a more in-depth assessment of your BDD. They may offer you more CBT or a different kind of therapy, as well as a different kind of antidepressant.

Causes of BDD

We don’t know exactly what causes BDD, but it might be associated with:

  • genetics – you may be more likely to develop BDD if you have a relative with BDD, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) or depression
  • a chemical imbalance in the brain
  • a traumatic experience in the past – you may be more likely to develop BDD if you were teased, bullied or abused when you were a child

Some people with BDD also have another mental health condition, such as OCDgeneralised anxiety disorder or an eating disorder.

Things you can try yourself

1. Support groups for BDD

Some people may find it helpful to contact or join a support group for information, advice and practical tips on coping with BDD.

You can ask your doctor if there are any groups in your area, and the BDD Foundation** has a (UK baseddirectory of local and online BDD support groups**.

You may also find the following (UK based)** organisations to be useful sources of information and advice:

2. Mental wellbeing

Practising mindfulness exercises may help you if you’re feeling low or anxious.

Some people also find it helpful to get together with friends or family, or to try doing something new to improve their mental wellbeing.

It may also be helpful to try some relaxation and breathing exercises to relieve stress and anxiety.

Editor’s Note:  

* Clarification Provided for our U.S. Readers

** Resources Outside the UK:

NHS Choices logo


From www.nhs.uk





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