Child Health & Safety News 10/15: 6 Safety Apps for Halloween

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: Starbucks offers backup child care to all employees http://bit.ly/2CKGoMd 

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 15 events & stories.

  • Motorcycle-riding firefighters give special ride to child battling rare health condition bit.ly/2IUmXRj 2018-10-14
  • WHY it is So Important for Kids to Know WHY – Today’s Mama bit.ly/2OpwUMI 2018-10-14
  • Should Your Child Stay Home Sick? A Close look at five symptoms by the Cleveland Clinic can Help you to Decide cle.clinic/2IVZDT4 2018-10-14
  • Tucson woman wants to make sure kids don’t lose their deported parents http://bit.ly/2CNGsLf 2018-10-14

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
6 of the best child-safety apps to keep kids safer this Halloween http://bit.ly/2Oqwu8F 

  • Small or small, boy? Pizzas targeted in war on childhood obesity bit.ly/2OkDpQG 2018-10-13
  • Goosebumps 2: is Sensory Friendly Tomorrow Morning at AMC bit.ly/2E44q6d 2018-10-12
  • Halloween Costumes for Special Needs Kids – Thurs Time Capsule 10/12 – bit.ly/2OeVxvj 2018-10-11
  • Targeting abnormal signals suggests novel method to treat a rare childhood blood disease Fanconi anemia http://bit.ly/2ClNfeb 2018-10-10
  • 41 kids sickened in Colorado’s enterovirus outbreak, health officials say http://bit.ly/2EngNdR 2018-10-10
  • How to talk to your kids about sexual abuse bit.ly/2pFs13g 2018-10-09
  • 8 Things You Should Tell Your Teenage Son About Sex bit.ly/2C3k9Qg  2018-10-08
  • How to Raise Kids With Manners in An Uncivilized World bit.ly/2OdfN0e 2018-10-08
  • Tomorrow Night at AMC, Venom is Sensory Friendly bit.ly/2E2hKIp 2018-10-08

Goosebumps 2: is Sensory Friendly Twice at AMC (10/13 & 10/27)

New sensory friendly logoSince 2007, AMC Entertainment (AMC) and the Autism Society have teamed up to bring families affected by autism and other special needs “Sensory Friendly Films” every month – a wonderful opportunity to enjoy fun new films in a safe and accepting environment. Tomorrow, Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween is Sensory Friendly at AMC.

The movie auditoriums will have their lights turned up and the sound turned down. Families will be able to bring in snacks to match their child’s dietary needs (i.e. gluten-free, casein-free, etc.), there are no advertisements or previews before the movie and it’s totally acceptable to get up and dance, walk, shout, talk to each other…and even sing – in other words, AMC’s “Silence is Golden®” policy will not be enforced during movie screenings unless the safety of the audience is questioned.

Does it make a difference? Absolutely! Imagine …no need to shhhhh your child. No angry stares from other movie goers. Many parents think twice before bringing a child to a movie theater. Add to that your child’s special needs and it can easily become cause for parental panic. Goosebumps 2 movie posterBut on this one day a month, for this one screening, everyone is there to relax and have a good time, everyone expects to be surrounded by kids – with and without special needs – and the movie theater policy becomes “Tolerance is Golden“.

Families affected by autism or other special needs can view a sensory friendly screening of  Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween on Saturday, October 13th or Saturday October 27th at 10am (local time). Tickets are typically $4 to $6 depending on the location. To find a theatre near you, here is a list of AMC theatres nationwide participating in this fabulous program (note: to access full list, please scroll to the bottom of the page).

Still to come in October:  Halloween (Tues. 10/23)

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Editor’s note: Although Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween has been chosen by the AMC and the Autism Society as this month’s Sensory Friendly Film, we do want parents to know that it is rated PG by the Motion Picture Association of America for frightening & intense scenes.  As always, please check the IMDB Parents Guide for a more detailed description of this film to determine if it is right for you and your family.

Child Health & Safety News 10/8: US Breaking Hot-Car-Death Record

Last updated on October 14th, 2018 at 08:23 pm

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Safety News: If Florence damaged your car seat, Safe Kids NC will be handing out new car seats to storm victims bit.ly/2OORndj  

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • Demand for campus child care in MN spurs outcry from parents strib.mn/2pDeXvb 2018-10-07
  • “What might a child-friendly airport look like?” bit.ly/2E53QVW  2018-10-07
  • Govt of Canada investing in maternal and child health bit.ly/2pIoBMV Funding will expand reach of the Baby-Friendly Initiative and help improve breastfeeding rates across Canada 2018-10-07
  • Of the four parental ‘feeding styles,’ only one is good for kids’ health, experts say cnn.it/2ykhcrm 2018-10-07

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
US on verge of breaking its own record for kids who’ve died in hot cars within a year.
Despite increased public awareness, 48 children have died this year 
https://abc11.tv/2RwAH8N 

  • How to Limit Screen Time Without Conflict – 5 experts weigh in bit.ly/2O6KJQ2 2018-10-06
  • Backpacks and laptops are required for most students, but together they contribute to back pain and long-term joint problems. bit.ly/2DWi6A4  2018-10-05
  • Change your child’s diet, decrease their need for an organ transplant bit.ly/2DW1AjS  2018-10-05
  • Join Pediatric Safety in Supporting Vulnerable Children bit.ly/2NZPrPv 2018-10-05
  • Sextortion Among Adolescents – Cyberbullying Research Center bit.ly/2Rt1enf  2018-10-05
  • Senators Call for Federal Investigation of Children’s Apps nyti.ms/2RqOYDK 2018-10-04
  • Sibling Warfare? Stay Neutral!! Thurs Time Capsule 10/12: bit.ly/2RofJsH 2018-10-04
  • Nemours doctors perform first pediatric liver transplant in Jamaica bit.ly/2P9K24M 2018-10-03
  • Uber Numb Pain Medication Recalled for Child Safety Risk http://bit.ly/2E6Lfsx 2018-10-03
  • Fun removes fear: Autistic teens, children meet first responders  bit.ly/2P4R2Qe 2018-10-02
  • Fire safety: 4 simple changes that can save lives http://bit.ly/2QHC9UL  2018-10-01
  • Being your child’s cyber-mentor on.today.com/2y1Elyx 2018-10-01
  • Atypical Representation: Special Needs Is Out of the Closet bit.ly/2zHvhB2 2018-10-01

Tomorrow Night at AMC, Venom is Sensory Friendly

Last updated on October 14th, 2018 at 08:22 pm

AMC Entertainment (AMC) has expanded their Sensory Friendly Films program in partnership with the Autism Society. This Tuesday evening, families affected by autism or other special needs have the opportunity to view a sensory friendly screening of Venom, a film that may appeal to older audiences on the autism spectrum.

As always, the movie auditoriums will have their lights turned up and the sound turned down. Families will be able to bring in snacks to match their child’s dietary needs (i.e. gluten-free, casein-free, etc.), there are no advertisements or previews before the movie and it’s totally acceptable to get up and dance, walk, shout, talk to each other…and even sing – in other words, AMC’s “Silence is Golden®” policy will not be enforced during movie screenings unless the safety of the audience is questioned.

Does it make a difference? Absolutely! Imagine …no need to shhhhh your kid. No angry stares from Venom movie posterother movie goers. Many parents think twice before bringing a child to a movie theater. Add to that your child’s special needs and it can easily become cause for parental panic. But on this one day a month, for this one screening, everyone is there to relax and have a good time, everyone expects to be surrounded by kids – with and without special needs – and the movie theater policy becomes “Tolerance is Golden“.

AMC and the Autism Society will be showing Venom as a sensory friendly feature film tomorrow, Tuesday, October 9th at 7pm (local time). Tickets can be as low as $4 to $6 depending on the location. To find a theatre near you, here is a list of AMC theatres nationwide participating in this fabulous program (note: to access full list, please scroll to the bottom of the page).

Still to come in October: Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween (Sat. 10/13 & 10/27); Halloween (Tues. 10/23)

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Editor’s note: Venom has been chosen by AMC and the Autism Society for a Tuesday Sensory Friendly “Mature Audience” screening. Parents should be advised that it is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for intense sequences of sci-fi violence and action, and for language.  As always, please check the IMDB Parents Guide for a more detailed description of this film to determine if it is right for you and your family.

How to Raise Kids With Manners in An Uncivilized World

REALITY CHECK: A survey conducted by US News & World Report found nine out of ten Americans felt the breakdown of common courtesy has become a serious problem in this country. A huge seventy-eight percent of those polled said manners and good social graces have significantly eroded over the past ten years, and is a major contributor to the breakdown of our values in this country. What’s more, 93 percent of adults feel the major cause of rudeness is because parents are have failed to teach respect to their kids.

What a sad commentary!

Make no mistake: courtesy does enhance our kids’ chances of success! Using good manners will enhance your child’s reputation in all arenas—home, school, and the community. Scores of studies find that well-mannered children are more popular and do better in school. Notice how often they’re invited to others’ homes? Kids like to be around kids who are nice. Listen to teachers speak about them using such positive accolades. Courteous children also have an edge later in life: the business world clearly tells us their first interview choices are those applicants displaying good social graces. They also get more “second” job interviews, and usually even the job. You just can’t help but react positively to people who are polite and courteous. By prioritizing polite behaviors with our children, we can enhance their social competence and give them a big boost towards success.

Every child has an “off day” and forgets their manners, but here are signs from The Big Book of Parenting Solutions that indicate that your child may need a more serious “Manners Tune-up.”

Signs a Manners Tweak Is Needed

  • A typical response is an impolite tone (sarcastic or surly) delivered with disrespectful body language (rolling eyes, smirking, shrugging shoulders).
  • Impolite behaviors are now more frequent or becoming a habit.
  • Constant reminders are needed to reinforce manners that you thought you had  already taught
  • Discourtesy is causing friction in your everyday relationship and breaking down your family harmony.
  • Social experiences and peer interactions (birthday or slumber party invites, dinners, etc) are hindered because your child lacks certain social graces or doesn’t feel comfortable using them.
  • Discourtesy is ruining his reputation among friends, parents, teachers, relatives, and family.

Parenting Solutions to Enhance Social Graces

All three of my sons attended a wonderful cooperative nursery school led by an incredibly caring teacher, Jeanette Thompson. The very first impression I had of the school was how well-mannered the children were. And, through the years as I put in my “coop” hours, I understood why her students were so polite:  Mrs. Thompson never taught manners at a special time, instead she taught students manners all day long through her own example. Every sentence she ever uttered contained the word “please,” “thank you,” or “excuse me.” It was impossible for her students not to be polite. She used to always tell the moms, “Manners are caught, not taught.”

Was Mrs. Thompson ever right! I also learned an important secret from my children’s teacher: The first step to teaching kids good manners is to make sure you model them yourself. Amen!

Disrespect, poor character, and diminishing moral intelligence are increasing. Here are a few solutions to enhance good social graces in your children and give them that edge for a better life based on Mrs. Thompson’s strategies of raising a well-mannered child.

1. Stress Courtesy

Good manners are among the simplest skills to teach children because they are expressed in just a few very specific behaviors. We can instantly point out good or poor manners to our kids: “Wow, nice manners! Did you notice the smile on Grandma’s face when you thanked her for dinner?” or “Eating before waiting for the others to sit down wasn’t polite,” We can modify our children’s manners: “Next time, remember to say ‘Excuse Me’ when you walk in front of someone.” And we can always tune them up: “Before you ask for the dish, say “Please.”

2. Point Out the Value of Manners

Discuss with your children the value of good manners. You might say, “Using good manners helps you gain the respect of others. It’s also a great way to meet new friends. Polite people just make the world a kinder place.” Once kids understand the impact good manners have on others, they’re more likely to incorporate courtesy in their own behavior.

3. Teach A Manner A Week

When my children were young I taught them a jingle, “Hearts, like doors, will open with ease, if you learn to use these keys.” We’d then print a manner a week on a large paper key and tape it on our kitchen door as a reminder. Every child in the neighborhood could recite not only our jingle, but name the manners that are the “keys to opening hearts.” It helped me recognize “catching new manners” doesn’t happen overnight: it takes consistent effort to enhance them in our kids.

How about teaching a “Manner a Week?” Write the manner on an index card, post it on your refrigerator, and then hold a contest to see how many times family members hear another member use the word.

Here are a few to get you started:

“Please., Thank you., May I?, Excuse me, I’m sorry., Pardon me., I’m glad to meet you,, You go first.,May I introduce….? Please pass…, ”

Just remember that the best way for kids to learn a new skill is through seeing the skill and then practicing it. So do the manner with your child — or as a family, and then provide fun ways to practice, practice, practice until the manner becomes a habit!

4. Correct Impoliteness Immediately

Use the 3 Bs of Discipline: When your child uses an impolite comment, immediately correct the behavior by using the three “Bs” of discipline: “Be Brief, Be Private so no one but you and your child is aware you’re correcting your child, and Be Specific.”

“Starting your dinner without waiting first for Grandma to sit down, was impolite. Being polite means always respecting older people.”

Waiting for the right time when only your child can hear your correction, preserves dignity but still lets a child know behavior is unacceptable.

5. Acknowledge Politeness ASAP

Please also remember to point out the moment your child uses those manners and let him know you appreciate his efforts. The quickest way to shape behavior is by pointing out the moment a child does the action the right way.

“Thank you for using your polite voice! Did you notice the big smile on Grandma’s face?”

“You waited for everyone to sit at the table before you started to eat. So polite! Thank you!”

6. Practice Manners

A friend of mine who really wanted to make sure her children “caught good manners” started a unique family tradition: Once a month, she asks her children to help her plan a party. The children plan the menu, set their table–with only their “company dishes”–arrange a centerpiece of hand-picked flowers, and then sit in their “Sunday best.”

The party is just for their family, and it’s the time my friend helps her children practice table manners such as “please pass,” “thank you,” “May I be excused?” (as well keeping your napkin on your lap, chewing with your mouth closed, waiting for others to speak, and learning which fork to use with each course).

Yes, it takes a lot of work, but she swears it’s worth it, especially when so many people comment on how well-behaved her children are.

7. Identify the Underlying Cause of Your Child’s Incivility

If your child has a more serious case of rudeness, then it’s time to dig deeper and discover the reason. Here are the most common reasons kids backslide in the manners department (and if you notice any of these issues in your home it’s time to roll up those sleeves and do some serious manner teaching) Manners not modeled or prioritized at home; Impolite peers or adults are being imitated; Music, movies, or TV that flaunt rudeness are having a bad influence; You’re allowing her to get away with it; Fatigue, stress or illness;Testing the limits; Never taught particular etiquette skills. What’s your best guess? Fix it!

Good manners do not develop naturally but instead are the result of considerable effort, patience, and diligent training. There’s no way around it. So keep encouraging your child’s efforts and teaching new manner skills until you get the results you hope for.

And don’t settle for less. Please! It’s our best hope for a civilized, well-mannered world!

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Dr Borba’s new book The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries, is one of the most comprehensive parenting book for kids 3 to 13. This down-to-earth guide offers advice for dealing with children’s difficult behavior and hot button issues including biting, tantrums, cheating, bad friends, inappropriate clothing, sex, drugs, peer pressure and much more. Each of the 101 challenging parenting issues includes specific step-by-step solutions and practical advice that is age appropriate based on the latest research. The Big Book of Parenting Solutions is available at amazon.com

Join Pediatric Safety in Supporting Vulnerable Children

Last updated on October 14th, 2018 at 08:25 pm

The weather is getting cooler, the leaves are changing colors, and the giving spirit is starting fill the air. Are you and your family looking for something to do this fall?

How about something you can do together that raises money for something wonderful? We’ve got some ideas.

Let us introduce you to some children’s health charities and fundraising events that we here at Pediatric Safety think are absolutely worth your time. Vulnerable children and their families depend on organizations and events like these to help support them in their time of need.

Please join us and support one of these great causes and help make the lives of these families, who have already been through so much, better.

Rett Syndrome

“Rett syndrome is a rare, non-inherited genetic neurological disorder that occurs almost exclusively in girls and leads to severe impairments, including seizures, scoliosis, and digestive difficulties.”

Children with Rett syndrome are believed to be able to understand a lot more than they can communicate and express a wide variety of emotions.

The trademark symptom of Rett syndrome is almost continuous repetitive hand movements when the child is not sleeping.

Fundraising

Rettysyndrome.org has a signature fundraising program called the Strollathon. This is their 16th year and they have over 25 locations participating around the country.

Their goal is 1 million dollars and they are almost halfway there.

For more information on how to donate, volunteer, or participate check out their website here.

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

St. Jude’s was founded in 1962 and is one of the world’s leading treatment and research centers for children with cancer.

Since 1962 treatments invented there have helped move the childhood cancer survival rate from 20% to more than 80% and their patient’s families never pay a dime.

They have treated patients from across all 50 states as well as other countries and have been able to do so primarily through individual’s donations.

Fundraising

Join Pediatric Safety in supporting the Sons of Thunder as they run in the St. Jude Memphis Marathon Weekend because “all a family should worry about is helping their child live.”

You can sign up to donate directly, sponsor a team, or you can participate in the marathon weekend yourself! Check out all the details here.

Autism Speaks Walk

“Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), refers to a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication.” ~ Autismspeaks.org

Roughly 1/59 children is affected by autism.

Autism speaks has funded nearly $150 million predominantly in scientific grants. The results of which have led to an additional $396 million in autism-related funding. They seek to support innovative research and lifelong supports and services for those affected by autism.

Fundraising

They have walks all over the country at different times throughout the year.

Find a location near you and participate in one of their fundraising walks or donate to them directly on their website.

Other Upcoming Fundraising Events:

Children’s National Health System – They have several events coming up in the Virginia area that you can check out here.

Nationwide Children’s Hospital – Big Lots just announced a national fundraising campaign to benefit the hospital, details here.

Children’s Miracle Network – They have national and local partners who have fundraising events year round. Or you can host your own!

National down syndrome society – They have upcoming events all across the US. Check them out here.