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Child Health & Safety News 8/20: Traces of Herbicide in Cheerios

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Safety News: Google is Tracking Android and iPhone Users – even with ‘Location History’ Turned Off – here is how to disable this…  bit.ly/2P6jzFF 

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • When healthy children die: Pediatricians are not superhumans bit.ly/2BoCsAP 2018-8-19
  • Report finds ‘worrisome’ levels of lead, arsenic in some baby foods (infant rice cereal & mashed sweet potatoes) if eaten daily bit.ly/2MqO8bC 2018-8-19
  • Parents in prison: The child health crisis no one is talking about http://bit.ly/2BiiK9Q 2018-8-19
  • The Subtle Beauty of Child Development: What is Lost When We Push Too Hard http://bit.ly/2Mk5h6s   2018-8-18
  • At a Glance: 3 Types of Self-Control Issues for Special Needs Kids https://u.org/2vSR8Tx  2018-8-18
  • Back to School: Tips to keep your child healthy this school year https://at.wftv.com/2MW0ft4 2018-8-18

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
Report Finds Traces of a Controversial Herbicide in Cheerios and Quaker Oats
Glyphosate declared probably carcinogen by WHO in 2015
https://nyti.ms/2BoDYTC

  • New integrated child health system goes live in Wales bit.ly/2BjUhRv Every child in Wales will have an active care record…and doctors will be able to access info about their health – past and present 2018-8-17
  • Why it’s important for kids to get a comprehensive eye exam as they head back to school?  bit.ly/2vSZBGB 2018-8-17
  • PetSmart Charities Grant Expands Pet Therapy Program at Children’s National bit.ly/2BhsPE4 More than 9,000 kids expected to benefit. 2018-8-17
  • How To Learn in the Age of Information Overload – Today’s Mama bit.ly/2BflMvx 2018-8-16
  • 76 Percent of Parents Concerned For Children’s Online Safety bit.ly/2Mf85C7 2018-8-16
  • Child development: What to expect at each age bit.ly/2P8KgK2 2018-8-15
  • Can Too Much Tech Cause ADHD Symptoms in Your Child? cle.clinic/2MP4h6y 2018-8-15
  • Here’s why safety is more important than style when choosing a child’s backpack, and here’s what to look for… bit.ly/2vKFPwG 2018-8-15
  • Motorcycle Club delivers toys and smiles to children at two local hospitals bit.ly/2MhEKqA 2018-8-13
  • ADHD Isn’t the Only Reason Kids Are Hyper bit.ly/2MFxeSA 2018-8-14
  • 8 Discipline Techniques That Make Behavior Problems Worse bit.ly/2P7C9gr 2018-8-14
  • Study raises concerns about young Muay Thai fighters and brain injuries. Some fighters are starting as young as 4 years old http://bit.ly/2BkE26G  2018-8-13

Thank you readers for your patience during our extended maintenance shut-down

Child Health & Safety News 7/30: Pepperidge Farm Goldfish Recall!

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Safety News: Using Zika virus to treat neuroblastoma in children bit.ly/2uUeAPV

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • Children’s Health: How to Tell When Your Child’s Appendix Is Acting Up http://bit.ly/2LMOmIE 2018-7-29
  • Your child has been diagnosed with cancer. Don’t panic. Smart treatments abound. https://hrld.us/2AjHjTl 2018-7-29
  • Healthy kids with sick sibling may hide emotions https://reut.rs/2mPtrXp 2018-7-29
  • What Is a ‘Safe’ Sleepover, & When Is Your Kid Ready? bit.ly/2LTbaTV  2018-7-28
  • Paternal depression almost as common as maternal postpartum depression bit.ly/2LOuSUk 2018-7-28

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
Pepperidge Farm Recalls Varieties of Goldfish Crackers bit.ly/2JSb39u

  • How Should You React When Your Child Makes a Mistake? bit.ly/2K4Rdbi 2018-7-27
  • Learn what being a champion of compassion looks like with our latest issue of our Kids Who Care newsletter  getrevue.co/profile/pediat… (via @revue) 2018-7-27
  • DeVos Proposes to Curtail Debt Relief for Defrauded Students nyti.ms/2LK5jn0 -7-26
  • Saturday morning, Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation is Sensory Friendly bit.ly/2Lepz0V 2018-7-26
  • 15 Things You Should Not Say to Your Teenage Daughter bit.ly/2JPdzxe 2018-7-25
  • Talking to Your Three-Year-Old to.pbs.org/2JRgIN7 2018-7-25
  • Video: How to Recognize and Deal with Child Sexual Abuse bit.ly/2LfPjd9 2018-7-25
  • This Disney Princess Changed My Daughter’s Life bit.ly/2LIYQpi – thank you Disney for Moana – a princess my daughter could relate to! 2018-7-24
  • ‘Shocking’ Rise in Severely Obese Primary School Children in their final year of school in England https://wb.md/2LYlaeI 2018-7-24
  • Pediatric Sepsis Care Within an Hour Decreases Chance of Death, Largest Ever Analysis Finds http://bit.ly/2uVk0u8 2018-7-24
  • American Academy of Pediatrics calls for “urgently needed reforms” to fix broken food additive regulatory system http://bit.ly/2AmnzP2 2018-7-23
  • Mom is Sick. How to Avoid Kids & Dog Taking Charge bit.ly/2LCfSoY 2018-7-23
  • Tomorrow night at AMC, Mama Mia! Here We Go Again is Sensory Friendly bit.ly/2LgJ5df 2018-7-23

Sat. Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation is Sensory Friendly

New sensory friendly logoSince 2007, AMC Entertainment (AMC) and the Autism Society have teamed up to bring families affected by autism and other special needs “Sensory Friendly Films” every month – a wonderful opportunity to enjoy fun new films in a safe and accepting environment. Tomorrow, Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation is Sensory Friendly at AMC.

Sensory Friendly Films was born when Marianne Ross, of Elkridge Maryland took her seven year old daughter, Meaghan, to a matinee to see a movie starring one of her favorite actors. She intentionally picked an early showing figuring there would be fewer people there, but when Meaghan saw her favorite guy on the big screen she began to flap her hands, dance, twirl and jump up and down. Unfortunately a few other movie-goers complained to staff, and the manager asked the Ross’ to leave.

It occurred to Marianne there were probably a lot of people who found themselves in similar situations – or worse yet, didn’t even try to go see a movie for fear of the possible outcome.  The next day, she called her local AMC Theatre and asked if Dan Harris, the manager, would be willing to set up a special screening for children on the autism spectrum.  Dan not only took her suggestions, but made it even more sensory friendly.

The movie auditoriums would have their lights turned up and the sound turned down. Families would be able to bring in snacks to match their child’s dietary needs (i.e. gluten-free, casein-free, etc.), there would be no advertisements or previews before the movie and it would be totally acceptable to get up and dance, walk, shout, talk to each other…and even sing.  It was a huge success! On this one day a month, for this one screening, everyone is there to relax and have a good time, everyone expects to be surrounded by kids – with and without special needs – and the movie theater policy becomes “Tolerance is Golden“.

Families affected by autism or other special needs can view a sensory friendly screening of Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation on Saturday, July 28th at 10am (local time). Tickets are typically $4 to $6 depending on the location. To find a theatre near you, here is a list of AMC theatres nationwide participating in this fabulous program (note: to access full list, please scroll to the bottom of the page).

Coming in August: TBD

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Editor’s note: Although Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation has been chosen by the AMC and the Autism Society as this month’s Sensory Friendly Film, we do want parents to know that it is rated PG by the Motion Picture Association of America for some action and rude humor.  As always, please check the IMDB Parents Guide for a more detailed description of this film to determine if it is right for you and your family.

Child Health & Safety News 7/23: Belts on School Buses?

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Safety News: An undercover reporter was trained as a Facebook moderator not to delete certain racist memes and images of child abuse read.bi/2LsxROu

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • Parents Behaving Badly: A Youth Sports Crisis Caught on Video and shamed on Facebook nyti.ms/2uDzVgw 2018-7-22
  • Empowering Kids with Play In An Anxious World n.pr/2uDEO9o  2018-7-22
  • Tips to Stay Sane on a Vacation With Your Toddler bit.ly/2LGCh4o 2018-7-22
  • These Math Learning Apps for Kids Are Anything but Dull bit.ly/2uFenjA 2018-7-21
  • Chilling impact of poverty on NZ child health bit.ly/2Lx94ch 2018-7-21
  • The Negative Effects of Social Media and Screen Time for Kids (Free Course) bit.ly/2LAIBL7 2018-7-20

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
Belts or no belts on school buses? bit.ly/2LEwLzD

  • Pediatric sports injuries bit.ly/2LclM40 Every year, 1.5 million children go down with a serious sports injury 2018-7-20
  • How to Help Adopted Children Face Their Unique Challenges bit.ly/2L0sXMJ 2018-7-20
  • Working Moms – 5 Tips for Balancing the Pressures of Work & Family bit.ly/2O0PxCx 2018-7-19
  • Leading Tennessee Hospital Lends a Helping Paw to Patients and Their Families prn.to/2Nsq1oO 2018-7-19
  • Greater Manchester schools warning over Tellonym – ‘most honest app on internet’ – is fueling cyberbullying bit.ly/2LqN6aR  2018-7-19
  • 5 Strategies to Conquer Your Kid’s Doctor Phobia Thurs Time Capsule – 07/12 bit.ly/2zQ1iJ0 2018-7-19
  • Study: HPV Vaccine, Safe and Effective Against Cervical Pre-Cancer bit.ly/2mn3UVk 2018-7-18
  • How Does Sensory Play Help With a Child’s Development? bit.ly/2JtGff1  2018-7-17
  • Cyber bullies target girl, 10, in ‘ugly or not’ Instagram poll bit.ly/2JtI23u This little girl put up an instagram acct and within hours became an “insta-target”….she is now on suicide watch. 2018-7-17
  • Keep Kids Safe Around Water at Summer Parties bit.ly/2L3aaA8 2018-7-17
  • School Bullying Must Be Taken Seriously | Roots of Action bit.ly/2zI4UNl 2018-7-16
  • Raising green babies: Teaching our children to love and respect the environment bit.ly/2NfTXo6 2018-7-16
  • With the supreme court confirmations focusing on abortion, some highly critical child health statistics are going unnoticed bit.ly/2Lhemse 2018-7-16
  • 8 Ways to Boost Our Kids’ Social-Emotional Skills bit.ly/2mj7Lm8 2018-7-16

Tues. at AMC, Mama Mia! Here We Go Again is Sensory Friendly

AMC Entertainment (AMC) has expanded their Sensory Friendly Films program in partnership with the Autism Society. This Tuesday evening, families affected by autism or other special needs have the opportunity to view a sensory friendly screening of Mama Mia! Here We Go Again, a film that may appeal to older audiences on the autism spectrum.

As always, the movie auditoriums will have their lights turned up and the sound turned down. Families will be able to bring in snacks to match their child’s dietary needs (i.e. gluten-free, casein-free, etc.), there are no advertisements or previews before the movie and it’s totally acceptable to get up and dance, walk, shout, talk to each other…and even sing – in other words, AMC’s “Silence is Golden®” policy will not be enforced during movie screenings unless the safety of the audience is questioned.

Does it make a difference? Absolutely! Imagine …no need to shhhhh your kid. No angry stares from other movie goers. Many parents think twice before bringing a child to a movie theater. Add to that your child’s special needs and it can easily become cause for parental panic. But on this one day a month, for this one screening, everyone is there to relax and have a good time, everyone expects to be surrounded by kids – with and without special needs – and the movie theater policy becomes “Tolerance is Golden“.

AMC and the Autism Society will be showing Mama Mia! Here We Go Again as a sensory friendly feature film tomorrow, Tuesday, July 24th at 7pm (local time). Tickets can be as low as $4 to $6 depending on the location. To find a theatre near you, here is a list of AMC theatres nationwide participating in this fabulous program (note: to access full list, please scroll to the bottom of the page).

Still to come in July: Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation (Sat. 7/28)

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Editor’s note: Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again has been chosen by AMC and the Autism Society for a Tuesday Sensory Friendly “Mature Audience” screening. Parents should be advised that it is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for some suggestive material .  As always, please check the IMDB Parents Guide for a more detailed description of this film to determine if it is right for you and your family.

Study: HPV Vaccine, Safe and Effective Against Pre-Cancer

“HPV vaccine for schoolgirls gets full marks,” reports ITV News.

Almost all cases of cervical cancer, which usually takes many years to develop, are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). HPV causes the cells in the cervix to slowly go through a series of pre-cancerous changes that can eventually turn into cancer.

The HPV vaccine helps protect against cervical cancer by preventing the cells of the cervix from changing into pre-cancerous cells.

In the UK, cervical cancer affects more than 3,000 women a year, with most cases diagnosed between the ages of 25 and 29. In 2016, 815 women died of cervical cancer.  A programme began 10 years ago to vaccinate schoolgirls aged 12 to 13 against HPV.

In this latest review, researchers pooled results from 25 trials worldwide involving more than 70,000 girls and young women.

  • After looking at the evidence, the researchers reported that the HPV vaccine provides excellent protection against development of pre-cancerous cells in the cervix.
  • This review found that vaccinating girls before they have HPV works best, cutting their chances of getting pre-cancerous cells linked to the most dangerous strains, HPV16 and HPV18, by 99%.
  • Vaccinating women aged 26 and over, and those who have already been infected, also cuts their chances of pre-cancerous cells but not as dramatically.
  • The researchers found no increased risk of miscarriage or other serious adverse events in the years following vaccination.

Find out more about the HPV vaccine.

Where did the story come from?

The study was carried out by researchers from the Belgian Cancer Centre and the University of Antwerp, both in Belgium, and Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust in the UK as part of the worldwide Cochrane Collaboration of research. It was funded by the National Institute of Health Research, European Cancer Network, Belgian Foundation Against Cancer, IWT (a Belgian science and technology institute) and the CoheaHr Network (part of the European Commission).

It was published by the Cochrane Collaboration and is free to read online.

The UK media celebrated the news that the vaccine is safe and works well, with ITV News asking: “Is it now time for boys to get it too?”

Boys are currently not routinely offered the vaccine, although some people have pressed for the programme to be extended. While boys do not get cervical cancer, they can pass HPV on to unvaccinated girls. The virus can also cause less common cancers of the throat, anus and penis.

What kind of research was this?

This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. This is the best way to find out whether a treatment works.

Carrying out a meta-analysis means researchers can pool evidence from smaller trials to come up with a more reliable result.

What did the research involve?

Researchers looked for randomised controlled trials that compared the HPV vaccine with a dummy vaccine (placebo) and measured how many girls or young women had pre-cancerous cells (called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) at grade 2 or above.

They also wanted to assess the vaccine’s effectiveness against the most dangerous strains, HPV16 and HPV18, which are thought to cause around 70% of all cervical cancers. The UK vaccination programme protects against both.

The 26 studies included 73,428 girls and women, mostly aged 15 to 26, with follow-up periods from 0.5 to 8 years. The researchers looked separately at results for:

  • girls or women who had no HPV infection when vaccinated
  • women aged over 26
  • the 2 different types of HPV vaccine, which protect against different strains

As well as looking for evidence of pre-cancerous cells, they checked for differences in rates of serious adverse events and pregnancy outcomes between women given the HPV vaccine and women given a placebo.

Unfortunately, results for cervical cancer were not available.

All the studies were assessed for risk of bias and, while all but one were funded by the vaccine manufacturers, the review’s authors said most of the trials were at low risk of bias.

What were the basic results?

Results were clearest for girls and young women who had not been infected with HPV at the time they were vaccinated. These findings are likely to be the most relevant for girls in the UK, who receive the vaccine at an age where they are unlikely to have come into contact with HPV.

For non-infected girls and women:

  • chances of having pre-cancerous cells (CIN grade 2) linked to HPV16 or HPV18 reduced from 164 per 10,000 to 2 per 10,000 – a reduction in relative risk (RR) of 99% (RR 0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00 to 0.05)
  • chances of having higher-grade pre-cancerous cells (CIN grade 3) linked to HPV16 or HPV18 reduced from 70 per 10,000 to 0 per 10,000 – a reduction in risk of 99% (RR 0.01, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.10)
  • chances of having pre-cancerous cells (CIN grade 2) linked to any strain of HPV reduced from 287 per 10,000 to 106 per 10,000 – a reduction in risk of 63% (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.55)
  • chances of having higher-grade pre-cancerous cells (CIN grade 3) linked to any strain of HPV reduced from 109 per 10,000 to 23 per 10,000 – a reduction in risk of 79% (RR 0.21, 95% CI 0.04 to 1.10)

The rate of deaths was similar among vaccinated and non-vaccinated women – 11 per 10,000 in the control group and 14 per 10,000 in the vaccine group – and no deaths were linked to the vaccine.

The HPV vaccine did not increase the risk of miscarriage or pregnancy termination. However, there was not enough information to be sure about the risks of stillbirth or babies born with malformations.

How did the researchers interpret the results?

The researchers said: “There is high-quality evidence that HPV vaccines protect against cervical pre-cancer in adolescent girls and women who are vaccinated between 15 and 26 years of age.”

They added that “protection is lower” when women are already infected with HPV at the time of vaccination.

Conclusion

This review provides reassurance for women and girls who have received the HPV vaccine, and for parents of girls due to receive it.

It found the vaccine does a good job of protecting against the most dangerous strains of HPV, which are passed on through sex and skin-to-skin contact of the genital areas.

The majority of the trials included in the review involved girls and women aged 15 to 26, which is slightly older than those vaccinated in the UK programme.

However, what made the key difference for the vaccine’s effectiveness was whether or not women already had HPV when they were vaccinated. By vaccinating girls at age 12 to 13, the chances of them being already infected are lower, which should increase the effectiveness of the vaccination programme.

HPV vaccination has been shown in this study to reduce the chances of women getting pre-cancerous cells in the cervix, but we need to see longer-term results to be sure this translates into a reduced chance of cervical cancer.

Most young women aged 14 to 25 in the UK should now have received the vaccine, meaning rates of cervical cancer may drop in the coming decades. In the meantime, women should continue to attend screening appointments for cervical cancer when invited.

Find out more about the HPV vaccine.

Analysis by Bazian
Edited by NHS Choices

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NHS Choices logo


From www.nhs.uk

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