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How to Care For Your Child if They Chip a Tooth

As parents, we do our best to care for our children when accidents or injuries occur. In dentistry, one of the most common dental emergencies that family and pediatric dentists see is chipped teeth.

By being prepared and knowing how to handle a chipped tooth, you can ensure your child is well looked after from the moment the injury occurs to when your family finally makes it to see your dentist.

Control Any Bleeding

The mouth bleeds easily and heavily, due to the many blood vessels supplying it. Apply pressure with a clean cloth or sterile gauze (a facial tissue works if you don’t have anything else on hand) to help stop any bleeding that’s occurring.

Look for the Tooth Fragment

If the damage to your child’s tooth is significant, your dentist may be able to bond the broken off portion back into place. The key is to find it quickly and store it properly, so that it doesn’t dry out. Place it in a sealed container and submerge it with milk, contact solution, or if nothing else is available, tap water.

Take note not to scrub the tooth fragment clean, especially if it’s a completely knocked out tooth. Doing so could make it harder for your dentist to put back in place.

See your dentist within the next hour if at all possible. The sooner you seek out care, the more conservative treatment will tend to be.

Baby vs. Permanent Teeth

How your dentist handles treating a chipped tooth will depend on if it’s a baby or adult tooth. Adult teeth need to be treated quickly to avoid permanent nerve damage or deterioration of the compromised enamel. However, baby teeth are typically handled on a case-by-case basis. Depending on the size of the chip, your dentist may only want to monitor the tooth to make sure it doesn’t start to die before it exfoliates (falls out) naturally on its own time. However, larger cracks and chips may require some type of filling or a crown.

Preserve Your Child’s Smile

The health of your child’s teeth plays a direct impact on the development of their adult smile, speech patterns, and even their self-esteem. If your child has chipped a tooth or suffered from a bump to the mouth, see your dentist for a quick exam and X-ray to determine the severity of the trauma.

Child Health & Safety News 10/29: US Childcare Nearing $10k/Yr

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: Google Is Teaching Children How to Act Online. Is It the Best Role Model? nyti.ms/2ApYp00

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • Establish Rules That Will Help Your Child Become a Responsible Adult bit.ly/2SkgfIJ 2018-10-28
  • Parents learning SIDS prevention for free thanks to Central Texas EMS agencies bit.ly/2CKiOOH 2018-10-28
  • Air pollution is the ‘new tobacco’, warns WHO head. And children and babies developing bodies are at greatest risk. http://bit.ly/2Pp3iyv 2018-10-27
  • Halloween costume tips to keep kids safe from the American Academy of Pediatrics bit.ly/2qfHaIA 2018-10-27
  • Study sheds light on sextortion, fastest-growing form of teen cyberbullying – The Daily Cardinal bit.ly/2Q1FD4u 2018-10-27
  • First study of its kind identifies differences in pediatric mortality after motor vehicle collisions bit.ly/2D4oLaj The goal: to determine if changes to medical services can impact outcomes 2018-10-26
  • Adenovirus Outbreak Leaves 6 Children Dead at N.J. Pediatric Center nyti.ms/2D0Umd7 2018-10-26

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
Child-care costs in America are getting close to $10,000 per year https://on.mktw.net/2zdAhvF 

  • Check out our latest issue of our Kids Who Care newsletter, “Compassion Through Creativity” getrevue.co/profile/pediat… (via @revue) 2018-10-26
  • Why Your Kid’s Daydreaming is Not All Bad bit.ly/2z2wsJs 2018-10-25
  • Kids don’t need a cellphone; they need a digital diet! A media diet is just like a regular diet. If you’re not consistent in the first few weeks and months, you will fail bit.ly/2D20AJC  2018-10-25
  • How to Talk to Your Kids About…Difficult Subjects – Thurs Time Capsule 10/12 bit.ly/2Aq4MjV  2018-10-25
  • 4 Things Your Toddler Should be Learning at Daycare bit.ly/2z3CMjV 2018-10-24
  • It’s Not Always Postpartum: The Truth About Prenatal Depression bit.ly/2D2UpoH  2018-10-24
  • Halloween oral health tips bit.ly/2R4Y5sM 2018-10-24
  • Goosebumps 2: is Sensory Friendly Twice at AMC (10/13 & 10/27) zpr.io/6FWst 2018-10-24
  • Pediatric research: Scientists developing probiotic biofilms to help smallest preemies bit.ly/2R7v27Z 2018-10-23
  • Don’t ignore incest: advice from an incest survivor bit.ly/2yTMxkH 2018-10-23
  • Study says working on your ‘dad bod’ before fatherhood can help your future kids’ health bit.ly/2S3Sk01 2018-10-23
  • The Techniques of a Predator Part 1: Trust and Romance bit.ly/2NQigch 2018-10-22

Child Health & Safety News 10/22: Polio-like Illness Paralyzing Kids

Last updated on November 2nd, 2018 at 11:10 pm

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: Therapy Dogs May Help Kids With ADHD, Study Suggests u.org/2PjCMTo

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • Safe Kids – Halloween Safety bit.ly/2q0UGQo 2018-10-21
  • Avoid Making Discipline Mistakes That Make Behavior Problems Worse bit.ly/2NUa8HL 2018-10-21
  • In Syria, A School Helps Children Traumatized By War – Budget cuts mean funds will dry up in January n.pr/2S7Cstb  2018-10-21
  • The Problem With the ‘Gifted’ Child Diagnosis bit.ly/2z19ym7 2018-10-21
  • Water wars: The ‘cult-like’ efforts to get fluoride out of America’s drinking supply nbcnews.to/2J7Qmrv 2018-10-19

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
‘Polio-like’ illness paralyzing children remains ‘mystery’ to health officials as CDC
confirms cases in 22 states fxn.ws/2R0hbAi

  • Number of Children Missing Critical Vaccines Continues to Rise bit.ly/2QYU3Co First case of flu-related pediatric death in unvaccinated child comes as CDC issues reports on overall vaccination coverage 2018-10-19
  • How Can a Cookie Teach My Child to be Calm? bit.ly/2CU1KH1  2018-10-19
  • Electric cars let kids drive themselves from the ward to the operating theater to make surgery less scary cnn.it/2J6XB2w 2018-10-18
  • Should Kids “Motor Mouth”? (do they need an electric toothbrush?) Thurs Time Capsule 10/12 bit.ly/2J409yv 2018-10-18
  • Webinar: Are You Concerned About Your Child’s Irritability? bit.ly/2Oyk9PZ November 7th – hosted by the NIH 2018-10-18
  • 6 Simple Ways to Ease Children’s Fears at the Doctor bit.ly/2Aeas00 2018-10-17
  • Caring for child refugees: 4 things you need to know bit.ly/2J0JEmV 2018-10-17
  • Sidelined children’s health official says EPA inaction means “kids are disposable” cbsn.ws/2ChvAnD  2018-10-16
  • England falling behind peers on child health – bit.ly/2RNiHqK 2018-10-15
  • A Family Home Fire Drill is For ALL Ages bit.ly/2OrifQY 2018-10-15
  • What to Do if Your Child Is Scared of Halloween bit.ly/2CMGyCK 2018-10-15
  • Collaborative aims to accelerate immunotherapy development for pediatric cancers bit.ly/2RKSmcW 2018-10-15
  • When Should I Get My Child a Dog…and What Should We Get??  With updated recommendations from our Kids & Canines Expert… bit.ly/2EmaMy9 2018-10-15

Goosebumps 2: is Sensory Friendly Twice at AMC (10/13 & 10/27)

Last updated on October 24th, 2018 at 12:04 am

New sensory friendly logoSince 2007, AMC Entertainment (AMC) and the Autism Society have teamed up to bring families affected by autism and other special needs “Sensory Friendly Films” every month – a wonderful opportunity to enjoy fun new films in a safe and accepting environment. Tomorrow, Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween is Sensory Friendly at AMC.

The movie auditoriums will have their lights turned up and the sound turned down. Families will be able to bring in snacks to match their child’s dietary needs (i.e. gluten-free, casein-free, etc.), there are no advertisements or previews before the movie and it’s totally acceptable to get up and dance, walk, shout, talk to each other…and even sing – in other words, AMC’s “Silence is Golden®” policy will not be enforced during movie screenings unless the safety of the audience is questioned.

Does it make a difference? Absolutely! Imagine …no need to shhhhh your child. No angry stares from other movie goers. Many parents think twice before bringing a child to a movie theater. Add to that your child’s special needs and it can easily become cause for parental panic. Goosebumps 2 movie posterBut on this one day a month, for this one screening, everyone is there to relax and have a good time, everyone expects to be surrounded by kids – with and without special needs – and the movie theater policy becomes “Tolerance is Golden“.

Families affected by autism or other special needs can view a sensory friendly screening of  Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween on Saturday, October 13th or Saturday October 27th at 10am (local time). Tickets are typically $4 to $6 depending on the location. To find a theatre near you, here is a list of AMC theatres nationwide participating in this fabulous program (note: to access full list, please scroll to the bottom of the page).

Still to come in October:  Halloween (Tues. 10/23)

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Editor’s note: Although Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween has been chosen by the AMC and the Autism Society as this month’s Sensory Friendly Film, we do want parents to know that it is rated PG by the Motion Picture Association of America for frightening & intense scenes.  As always, please check the IMDB Parents Guide for a more detailed description of this film to determine if it is right for you and your family.

Child Health & Safety News 10/1: 74% of Child Restraints Misused

Last updated on October 14th, 2018 at 08:23 pm

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: Viral Video of Baby Breathing Shows Important Warning Sign Ahead of Flu Season bit.ly/2NEOdsz 

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • Video: Boy Who Was Tongue-Tied Speaks for First Time nyti.ms/2R7H0zk Little boy who suffered a brain aneurysm when he was a baby, was mostly nonverbal until his dentist noticed that he had an issue with his tongue and corrected it with a quick operation 2018-9-30
  • Top 3 Reasons Social Media is Good for Teens – bit.ly/2R9s5Vn 2018-9-30
  • Prevent Behavior Problems By Teaching Your Child About Feelings bit.ly/2R32Hk9 2018-9-29
  • I Was a Teenage Cutter — & This Is What Parents Need to Know: Confessions of a Former Cutter bit.ly/2NTAuOT 2018-9-29
  • The Best Ways to Get a Preschooler to Behave bit.ly/2N72c5v Behavioral problems and effective solutions for your 3, 4, and 5-year-olds 2018-9-29

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
New study released for Child Passenger Safety Awareness Week
74% of child restraint devices are misused!  bit.ly/2zpZN23

  • In Britain, Even Children Are Feeling the Effects of Austerity nyti.ms/2Oj2U45 2018-9-28
  • E.P.A. Places the Head of Its Office of Children’s Health, Dr. Ruth Etzel, a pediatrician and epidemiologist who has been a leader in children’s environmental health for 30 years, on Leave – no reason was given nyti.ms/2DAnkBx 2018-9-28
  • On Oct. 1, San Antonio becomes the first Texas city to raise tobacco buying age m.chron.com/business/local… 2018-9-28
  • 59% of US Teens Have Experienced Some Form of Cyberbullying | Pew Research Center pewrsr.ch/2Il1YXu 2018-9-28
  • In the latest issue of our Kids Who Care Newsletter, we’re sharing a story about a whole community who came together to give one last Christmas to a little boy who only has a couple of months to live.  getrevue.co/profile/pediat… 2018-9-28
  • Is Your Stress Harming Your Kids? Thurs Time Capsule 09/12 – bit.ly/2xVEJOP 2018-9-27
  • Talking to Teens about Suicide | Education Devpt Center bit.ly/2R1zDJS 2018-9-26
  • Bullied youth and teens who can get physical injuries, experience social and emotional distress, inflict self-harm and can even die (CDC). It increases risk of depression, anxiety, sleep difficulties, lower academic achievement and dropping out of school. usat.ly/2QVhjBV 2018-9-26
  • 8 Ridiculous Excuses For Not Getting A Flu Shot bit.ly/2QUXZF1 2018-9-25
  • Did you know that executive functions precede both learning and academic achievement? We must improve students cognition and motor timing + rhythm for them to learn better bit.ly/KineticClass 2018-9-24
  • Parents face tougher rules to get immigrant children back bit.ly/2zq1Bbr 2018-9-24
  • This is Child Passenger Safety Week – Go get your car seat checked at one of Safe Kids’ Car Seat Checkup Events bit.ly/2NBW3U0 2018-9-24
  • Best Dental Hygiene For Your Child, From Baby to Teenager bit.ly/2zon6cI 2018-9-24
  • West Coast Hospitals Get $6M FDA Grant for Pediatric mHealth and telehealth Support bit.ly/2zpiTFv 2018-9-24

Best Dental Hygiene For Your Child, From Baby to Teenager

Last updated on October 14th, 2018 at 08:24 pm

A smile is important at every age, but especially for children. The health of a child’s smile today can affect his or her oral health decades down the road.

Here are a few important things that your dentist wants you to know in regard to helping children of all ages have healthy teeth for life.

Infancy

Pediatricians and pediatric dentists recommend scheduling your baby’s first dental visit by age 1, or when the first teeth erupt. Before your baby gets teeth, clean his or her gums with a soft damp washcloth after every feeding.

Once teeth start to erupt, use a small toothbrush to clean your child’s teeth with tap water or a rice-sized smear of fluoridated toothpaste (recent ADA recommendations have change from introducing fluoride toothpaste at a later age, to a much younger one).

Toddlerhood

Until your child can tie his or her own shoes, he or she needs your help brushing his or her teeth. While it’s fine to encourage independent tooth brushing, be sure to go back behind your child to get a “good” clean in at least twice daily.

Start to watch for teeth touching side-by-side. If they do, use a handheld floss pick to clean these areas, too.

School Age Children

By now, your child is likely brushing his or her own teeth and starting to learn how to floss. Adult molars will be erupting somewhere around the age of 6 (first set) and 12 (second set). Boys tend to get theirs around the same time or slightly later. When they do, talk to your dentist about getting protective sealants to prevent cavities before they start.

Teens

The day finally arrives when your child has a full set of permanent (adult) teeth. Encourage daily flossing, since these teeth will be with him or her for life.

During dental appointments, have your dentist evaluate your teen’s bite for possible orthodontic needs along with developing wisdom teeth. Because your teen’s oral anatomy is still developing, it’s the best time to intercept any orthognathic (skeletal) needs. By the time your teen reaches 18 or early-college age, his or her oral anatomy will be nearly completely formed.

Schedule a Dental Checkup Twice a Year

Be sure to take your child for a dental checkup and cleaning every six months. These regular visits allow your dentist to screen for common issues that can leave a lasting impact on your child’s smile. With great preventative care and oral hygiene starting at a young age, your child can enjoy a confident smile that lasts for years to come.