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Child Health & Safety News 7/16: US Opposes Breastfeeding

Last updated on July 30th, 2018 at 02:26 pm

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: The Safest and Most Dangerous States for Kids Online bit.ly/2mkMZ5M

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • Child Health Protection Act just the the start of healthier food environments for kids bit.ly/2mlVBZW 2018-7-15
  • US Says Breast Isn’t Best, Angers Moms & Docs Alike bit.ly/2KTJ8eF 2018-7-15
  • Developmentally Appropriate Toys and Things to Avoid – Toddler Health bit.ly/2mlff89  2018-7-14
  • The billion-dollar industry of detaining immigrant kids cbsn.ws/2mjaWKU from $74.5M in 2007 to $958M in 2017 and rising 2018-7-14
  • The 10 golden rules of air travel for families bit.ly/2N8k0xp 2018-7-13
  • The World of Child Immigration and What We Can Do to Help bit.ly/2zpBqDB 2018-7-13

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
U.S. Attempts to Block Resolution Endorsing Breast-Feeding – Stuns World Health Officials
nyti.ms/2J0WJuV

  • Does Your Student Need A Campus Health Insurance Plan? on.wfmy.com/2zsFjba 2018-7-13
  • Speech Milestones for Toddlers bit.ly/2JfSlZf 2018-7-12
  • Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta opens first out-patient, non-emergency medical center bit.ly/2KRvUyQ  2018-7-12
  • Man gives out gun locks to residents after child’s accidental shooting bit.ly/2KVLrgB 2018-7-12
  • Einstein Your Thinking and Keep Your Child Safe Around Water Thurs Time Capsule – 07/11 bit.ly/2tWtWSK 2018-7-11
  • Primary Children’s Hospital to give out free Baby Safety Snaps – a visual reminder that baby is in car seat bit.ly/2N5EarE 2018-7-11
  • Tips For Choosing The Best Preschool TV Shows From A Children’s Show Creator bit.ly/2N4ApTH 2018-7-11
  • How to Plan Activities That Keep Babies & Toddlers On The Move bit.ly/2N1g1mc 2018-7-11
  • How to Prepare for Your Child’s First Sleepover bit.ly/2zqWycC 2018-7-11
  • Constable Care Child Safety Foundation launches world-first road safety app for kids featuring real-life situations for W. Australia students bit.ly/2zptsKJ 2018-7-10
  • Smart technology to remind parents a child is in the back seat – 4 different options tested and compared bit.ly/2m6LyYH 2018-7-09
  • Summer and Beyond: How to Get Your Special Needs Child To Read bit.ly/2u3ATSV 2018-7-09
  • Ant-Man and The Wasp are Sensory Friendly Tomorrow Night at AMC bit.ly/2ucVUJX 2018-7-09

Summer and Beyond: How to Get Your Special Needs Child To Read

Last updated on July 15th, 2018 at 07:23 pm

Many schools have started assigning Summer Reading to keep kids in good habits and also to avoid the dreaded summer brain drain, where they lose some of the skills learned during the academic year due to lack of practice. Sometimes the reading assignment can be fun, like a competition to see who reads the most pages or books or minutes. Sometimes it can be a straight assignment like a project or a report. But even if your school doesn’t specifically assign any reading, it’s a good idea to encourage your kids to keep reading all summer long.

I know many kids with special needs or learning challenges absolutely hate reading. It is truly unpleasant for them, so who can blame them? For now there are other ways to make books appealing. When my kids were little we used them to play games like The Floor is Lava and Dominoes. Then I read the books to them after play time. Reading to your child is important even if you think they are “too old” for it – they are not. Something as simple as “Hey, this is interesting, listen…” may get them motivated to explore (or listen) further.

Ideas to keep kids reading – or get them reading

  • Let them read whatever they want – manga, movie novelizations, comic books all count. I even let my daughter read a toy catalogue once because it was the only thing that motivated her.
  • Let your child be your tour guide. This works on vacation or locally. Let them do research on a location that interests them and pick out some place to visit. This also works with restaurants and reading menus.
  • Take them to the library. Check your local locations for puppet shows, clubs or events…and hey, look, there are lots of books, too! Maybe one will catch their eye. Again, let them choose. You may not want to read a novel with a gory zombie on the cover but if it gets them interested, so be it.
  • Bring books to places where you will be waiting, like doctors and dentists appointments. Put baskets of them in the bathroom.
  • Audio books can also help kids with visual processing and other challenges. Many are free online through your local library or other sites – just do a quick search.
  • Who are your child’s heroes? There are biographies on every historical figure, sports star and celebrity.
  • Yes, it’s okay to let them reread Harry Potter again – as long as you get them thinking about what they noticed this time that they never did before.

Another way to get kids with special needs or challenges interested in a book is if the story is about a kid with challenges. Students will recognize their own struggles and situations and pick up some new strategies. Feel free to read the books yourself – grownups may learn some of the clever ways these kids avoid work and play their teachers.

Here are some reading suggestions about children with special needs for teens. Ask a bookstore employee, teacher or librarian for other suggestions.

  • Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper features a girl with cerebral palsy
  • Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt follows a girl and her older brother as they discover they have dyslexia
  • El Deafo by Cece Bell, a graphic novel about a girl with a clunky hearing aid

Have you or your child read a great book lately? Let us know about it!

 

Child Health & Safety News 7/2: Should Kids Be Polite to Alexa?

Last updated on July 15th, 2018 at 07:31 pm

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: If Your Kid Ingests A Button Battery, Call 911. Then Do This!  bit.ly/2MVRtvA 

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 25 events & stories.

  • Pinned down: A story of restraining an autistic child and the marks it leaves behind bit.ly/2IIP2ZZ 2018-7-01
  • What steps can you take to protect your child from a would-be abductor cin.ci/2lHPnDo 2018-7-01
  • Nearly Half of Canada’s Very Young Children Live in Child Care ‘Deserts’ glblctzn.me/2tKZWd6 2018-7-01
  • How to Exercise With Your Kids bit.ly/2IG3fHa Here are some ideas to get you started 2018-6-30
  • Fireworks Safety bit.ly/2KzVQy4 2018-6-30
  • The Difference Between ADHD and Autism u.org/2IBz1oO by Understood.org 2018-6-30

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Top Headline of the Week
The case against teaching kids to be polite to Alexa  bit.ly/2MBgFGZ

  • Toy car therapy helps pediatric patients recover fcnews.tv/2tOjRHp 2018-6-29
  • Please realize the importance of your Digital Footprint! bit.ly/2IC4A1F  2018-6-29
  • Getting Your Child to Talk to you About What They see Online bit.ly/2llAhDm 2018-6-29
  • An EMT Shared an Important Car Seat Hack to Keep Kids Safe in an Emergency bit.ly/2lBFLdf 2018-6-29
  • Check out our latest issue of our Kids Who Care newsletter – Issue #10: A Future of Compassion getrevue.co/profile/pediat… 2018-6-29
  • 6 Mothers Explain How They’re Raising Feminist Sons bit.ly/2lGbw4W 2018-6-28
  • Tickling Your Toddler Might Actually Be Harmful bit.ly/2Kd0vXs  2018-6-28
  • The Importance of Teaching Kids to Use 911 – Thurs Time Capsule – 07/10 bit.ly/2KbTl5T 2018-6-28
  • Latest in health news: Pediatric antibiotic usage decreases, autism diagnoses increase bit.ly/2lz8uPZ 2018-6-27
  • My Twins are Behind in Talking…How Can I Help? bit.ly/2Mma6rq  2018-6-27

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News #2 Headline of the Week
Child homelessness in England is at its highest since the global financial crisis   bit.ly/2Ko7Y5Y

  • Kids Are Overdosing on Med Meant to Fight Opioid Addiction bit.ly/2lxEiEL 2018-6-27
  • What to cover during prenatal visit: AAP clinical report offers guidance bit.ly/2lz8nUz  2018-6-26
  • Profit and Complacency: We Make Our Children Vulnerable Online | Turtler bit.ly/2tB08ek 2018-6-26
  • Mind the gap: Navigating the transition from pediatric to adult health care bit.ly/2yDtqyp 2018-6-25
  • Telegram Messenger App Guide for Parents – 8 min video by Josh Ochs bit.ly/2MRCBhY 2018-6-25
  • More than two-thirds of towns and cities in the United Kingdom have unsafe levels of air pollution, resulting in more than 4.5 million children growing up in unsafe conditions, according to new research from UNICEF bit.ly/2Ki2CID 2018-6-25
  • Tomorrow at AMC Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is Sensory Friendly bit.ly/2MvFfKd  2018-6-25
  • Kids and Medication: What Parents Should Know to Avoid Errors bit.ly/2KizRIR 2018-6-25

 

Kids and Medication: What Parents Should Know to Avoid Errors

Last updated on July 15th, 2018 at 07:33 pm

Let’s discuss medication use in children because many parents feel that an office visit to the Doctor for their child is not complete without a medication to use regardless of the cause for the visit.

First, many Doctors are getting away from using medications of all kinds for minor illnesses.  Antibiotics are not effective for the most common infections seen in Children, viruses. Typical “cold medicines are found to have side effects:  these  adverse effects include, but are not limited to irritability, loss of appetite,  poor sleep and  restlessness to name a few. Antibiotics are becoming even ineffective against certain bacteria because of over use and development of resistances to those antibiotics.  Those people who may contract an infection for which the choices of antibiotics have become limited potentially pose a problem for every one.

Next a few “rules of the road” when using any medication on children:

  1. Children are not to be considered “ just small adults” when given any medicines- the dosages are calculated differently, they react to medicines in a different way than adults, the illnesses to be treated are not necessarily the same in adults and children, side effects of these medications can appear different in adults and children.  Never look at your child and try to calculate any dosage based on a percentage of your own weight, or any side effects that you may have.
  2. Just because a child has an illness does not mean that “medicine” is necessary.  There are some who reach for the medicine cabinet as soon as their child sneezes or exhibits a runny nose, or cough.  Given what I explained above, this is certainly not necessary and in some cases may make things worse.  Same thing occurs with onset of fever and this has been discussed previously, not all fevers require medication to lower them.
  3. Learn some easy measurements:
  •      1 cc or 1 ml is 1/5 of a teaspoon which is 5ccs
  •      5ccs or one teaspoon is 1/3 of a tablespoon which is 15 cc
  •      30cc is approximately one ounce, and 8 ounces is a cup
  •      1000 cc’s equals one liter or a little more than a quart
  •     16 ounces = 1 pint and 32 ounces = 1 quart
  •      4 quarts = 1 gallon

It is good to know these equivalents but be sure you totally understand the instructions for a medicine before you leave the pharmacy, and be sure the pharmacist has supplied you with the correct measuring utensil.  These can come as accurate little measuring spoons or even syringes measured in cc’s. A kitchen teaspoon or tablespoon is not very accurate and is often not close enough for the required measurement. Ask the pharmacist about this before you leave the pharmacy and don’t use a kitchen teaspoon or tablespoon for your child’s medicine unless they say it will be ok.

  1. When giving your child medication according to a schedule, write the times and dosage down as a reminder and save any dosing instructions until they have completed the entire prescription. If they accidentally miss a dose, in “most cases” (unless these are cardiac meds or similar) it will likely not make a difference, however I recommend checking the dosing instructions just to make sure your doctor has not specified “not to skip a dose” in which case you should probably give the dose when you think of it. If in doubt contact your child’s doctor or the pharmacy.

Your child will be happier and safer if you remember these few things

Personal WaterCraft & Kids: How to Make Them Fun AND Safe!

Last updated on July 15th, 2018 at 07:35 pm

Watercraft familySummer is fast approaching and that means that thousands of children will be hitting the water looking to go fast! Summer is the time to think about the beach and being outside and speeding around oceans, lakes or canals in PWC or personal watercrafts. PWC have steadily risen in ownership in the U.S to well over a million and with that increase in ownership come’s an increase in operators and injuries to the tune of over 12,000 documented injuries annually. Most injuries seem to occur when PWC collide—either with other vessels including other PWC or with fixed objects such as docks or tree stumps. Behavioral factors cited in 3 studies include operator inexperience (most operators had <20 hours of experience in boat operation), operator inattention, and excess speed or reckless operation. Some PWC can seat as many as 3 people and hit speeds of 60 mph. PWC are the only recreational boats for which the leading cause of death is not drowning; most fatalities result from blunt trauma.

The answer to the question of how to keep our children safe on the water seems to be the same as it has been for quite some time. Education and hands on practice. We need to educate our children and ourselves on water safety, both in and out of the water and both for operating and riding on a PWC. The Personal Watercraft Industry Association has the following recommendations:

RECOMMENDATIONS

  1. No one younger than 16 years should operate PWC.
  2. The operator and every passenger must wear a US Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device.
  3. Alcohol or other drug use should be avoided before and while operating PWC.
  4. Participation in a safe boater course with specific information about PWC should be required before operating PWC.
  5. Safe operating practices, such as no operation between sunset and sunrise, no wake jumping, and observing posted speed limits or no-wake zones, should be followed. (No-wake zone means the craft speed is slow enough that no wake is formed behind the craft as it crosses a specific area.)
  6. PWC should not be operated where swimmers are in the water.
  7. If a PWC is being used to tow another person on skis, knee boards, tubes, or other devices, a second person must face the rear to monitor the person being towed.
  8. All persons who rent PWC should be required to comply with these recommendations.
  9. Protective equipment such as wet suits, gloves, boots, eyewear, and helmets may be appropriate to wear.

When it comes to PWC, owning and operating a PWC is the same as owning and operating a car and should be treated with the same amount of respect. Would you hand over your car keys to your child who has little to no driver training? Of course not and the same should hold true when it comes to any PWC. The numbers don’t lie. Everyone needs PWC drivers Ed. Putting in the time before hand will save a lot of pain and suffering during what should be the most fun time of the year for kids.

Thank you and be safe

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Editor’s Note:  This post first appeared on Pediatric Safety in April 2013. We thought now might be a good time to revisit it. 

Child Health & Safety News 6/11: # Suicidal Kids Hospitalized Double

Last updated on June 22nd, 2018 at 01:50 am

twitter thumbIn this week’s Child Health News: A record number of children died of flu this season. This is the highest number in a flu season excluding pandemic years. Approx 80% had not received a flu vaccination this season nbcnews.to/2sHWijY 

Welcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world. Each day we use social media to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we overlook something, but overall we think we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. Still, quite a bit happens every day – so to make sure you don’t miss anything, we offer you a recap of this week’s top 20 events & stories.

  • Why Grandmothers May Hold The Key To Human Evolution https://n.pr/2y2U97u
  • Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way n.pr/2LACLc0 2018-6-10
  • Instead of Freaking Out When Daycare Raises Tuition Follow These Tips bit.ly/2sIHFwE 2018-6-10
  • Firefighters install child safety equipment in family homes bit.ly/2xXgTpc  2018-6-09
  • “One out of two of America’s children will have a mental, emotional or behavioral disorder – things like addictions, ADHD, anxiety disorders, depression, etc. by age 18,” bit.ly/2sVcNIq  2018-6-09

PedSafe Child Health & Safety News Headline of the Week
A recent study on mental health by Greg Plemmons, M.D. at VUMC children, found that the number of school-age children and adolescents hospitalized for suicidal thoughts or attempts has more than doubled since 2008. 

  • When Jordan found out she had scoliosis, it was the scariest day of her life. Learn how she turned it all around and learned to love what made her unique: 2018-6-08
  • The Father’s experience in the NICU | bit.ly/2M9th8X 2018-6-08
  • Outdoor Fun for Allergic Kids? Absolutely! Just Be Prepared bit.ly/2Hq1o8E 2018-6-08
  • Tomorrow morning, SOLO: A Star Wars Story is #SensoryFriendlyat AMC bit.ly/2Jyjsml 2018-6-08
  • The Sleep Fairy and 4 Other Tricks to Help Your Kid Sleep cle.clinic/2M6wPc1 – Great advice from the Cleveland Clinic 2018-6-07
  • Special Siblings: How a Child Sees Special Needs – Thurs Time Capsule 05/11 bit.ly/2sAOWOO  2018-6-07
  • What Budget Cuts Mean for Third Graders in a Rural U.S, School nyti.ms/2M1sV3U 2018-6-06
  • How To Manage Atopic Eczema – An Itchy, Scaly Children’s Rash bit.ly/2M3ZNsH 2018-6-06
  • Artist Reimagines Disney Princesses As Career Women And It’s Everything bit.ly/2LjMT96 2018-6-05
  • Summer puts special emphasis on water safety with kids bit.ly/2stLGFa  2018-6-04
  • How to Teach Your Kids Empathy-Building Skills bit.ly/2J3ubWx 2018-6-04
  • Video on child hunger shows kids reacting to the fact that 1 in 5 children in the U.S. is hungry – terrific to see them offer their ideas on solutions bit.ly/2JbbAaX  2018-6-04