Community

Last updated on October 13th, 2013 at 03:35 pm

welcomeThey say it takes a village to raise a child. It’s doubly so when a child’s health and well-being is concerned. Welcome to our “village” where you can hear from our team of experts their thoughts on current and ongoing child health and safety issues as well as share stories in areas like how you’re handling a particular child health-related challenge or the ups-and-downs we face every day trying to keep kids safe. Our Pedsafe Forum is there for you anytime to ask questions and exchange ideas.

By the way – we use “pedsafe” as a tag in our posts and #pedsafe in our tweets so that we can always find each other’s posts and tweets …so please help us out and tag yours too.

Latest Community Posts

Teenage Acne: As a Parent, What You Need to Know – Part II

Teenage Acne: As a Parent, What You Need to Know – Part II

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In my last post I discussed the pathophysiology of acne and how a pimple is formed. From the initial plugging of the duct going from the small gland in the skin to the outside to the colonization of the thick material stuck in the duct with bacteria. The growth of bacteria and the eventual formation of a pimple was the final common pathway to the process. All of the forms of treatment are aimed at relieving one of the above factors. The simplest form of treatment is the use of keratolytic agents which cause the top layers of skin to peal faster than they ordinarily do. You must remember that our... 

Teenage Acne: As a Parent, What You Need to Know – Part I

Teenage Acne: As a Parent, What You Need to Know – Part I

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The scourge of adolescence, acne appears in young adults very frequently and is the cause of much concern, anxiety and even behavioral disorders that can lead to forced changes in life style. It has a wide range of presentations from tiny black dots (black heads) to large cystic reddened lesions that can lead to lifelong disfigurement. This article is to explain, at least partially, the cause, course and treatment of this common problem in an effort to ease the pain that your adolescent might go through. At a certain time in a child’s life, usually between 12 and 16 years of age, there is an... 

This Summer, Help Your Kids Fight the “Common Mold” Allergy

This Summer, Help Your Kids Fight the “Common Mold” Allergy

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The term “hay fever” brings to mind pollen and ragweed allergies, but mold can be the sneaky culprit behind summer sneezing, sniffling and itchy eyes. “Many allergy sufferers assume their symptoms are caused by pollen, when they’re actually allergic to mold,” says Dr. James L. Sublett, section chief of the pediatric allergy department at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, in Louisville, Ky. The mold truth: Forty million Americans suffer from allergic rhinitis (aka hay fever), and mold is one of several triggers — especially in summertime. Mold allergy symptoms peak... 

Building a Child’s Confidence Through Dog Training

Building a Child’s Confidence Through Dog Training

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Many people who know me and are friends with me now, have a very hard time believing that it was not that long ago that I was a nervous, insecure person with horrible self esteem, and no self confidence. And there are two things in my life that I credit for this miraculous turn around. The first was finding the 12-step fellowship program of Narcotics Anonymous, and getting my act together. But even that had not given me the ‘personality make-over’ I so desperately craved. Those early years of recovery for me were not easy, and it did not ‘cure’ my insecurities and low self esteem. It did,... 

How to Talk to Your Kids About…Mistakes

How to Talk to Your Kids About…Mistakes

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Mistakes are part of life. Learning from our mistakes is a vital part of growing up. In fact, research shows us that kids learn more from making mistakes, then taking the easy route and getting everything correct all the time. So how do we talk to our kids about their mistakes?Don’t sigh or scoff when your children make mistakes or when discussing their mistakes. Don’t talk about how the mistake has made your life inconvenient. Never make your child feel bad because you had to exert effort to clean up after a mess, or work through the mistake. Don’t ask for perfection. Instead, offer praise...