Community

welcomeThey say it takes a village to raise a child. It’s doubly so when a child’s health and well-being is concerned. Welcome to our “village” where you can hear from our team of experts their thoughts on current and ongoing child health and safety issues as well as share stories in areas like how you’re handling a particular child health-related challenge or the ups-and-downs we face every day trying to keep kids safe. Our Pedsafe Forum is there for you anytime to ask questions and exchange ideas.

By the way – we use “pedsafe” as a tag in our posts and #pedsafe in our tweets so that we can always find each other’s posts and tweets …so please help us out and tag yours too.

Latest Community Posts

Kids Need Vitamin D – Can It Be Gotten Safely From Sunlight

Kids Need Vitamin D – Can It Be Gotten Safely From Sunlight

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Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones, and in the UK from around late March/early April to the end of September we get most of our vitamin D from sunlight exposure**. Find out how to get enough without risking sun damage.We need vitamin D to help the body absorb calcium and phosphate from our diet. These minerals are important for healthy bones, teeth and muscles. A lack of vitamin D – known as vitamin D deficiency – can cause bones to become soft and weak, which can lead to bone deformities. In children, for example, a lack of vitamin D can lead to rickets. In adults, it can... 

Autism Awareness Month: A Chance to Redefine Disability

Autism Awareness Month: A Chance to Redefine Disability

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April is Autism Awareness Month. For those of us in the special needs trenches this might seem odd because if autism has impacted your life you are always aware of it every minute of every day. The reality is that many people have no idea what autism truly is. They might watch The Good Doctor or Sesame Street, and while it is terrific that autism and other conditions are being represented in mainstream media often these portrayals are flawed or fail to paint the complete picture. Autism Society defines autism spectrum disorder as a complex developmental disability that affects individuals differently... 

Video: Teens and Tattoos: How to Make Sure Your Teen is Safe

Video: Teens and Tattoos: How to Make Sure Your Teen is Safe

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Niall McManus, tattoo artist, discusses things to consider before getting a tattoo and how to do so safely.   Editor’s Note: Video Highlights  Things to know before getting a tattoo: Do your researchCheck out your artist’s website to see their style.Make sure it’s what you want.Go to the shopMake sure you’re comfortable the person tattooing you Make sure it’s a reputable shopEvery shop and every artist must have a license. They must be displayed on siteMake certain your artist is taking the required safety precautions.Wearing gloves during... 

How Important is it to Treat Your Child’s Tooth Decay?

How Important is it to Treat Your Child’s Tooth Decay?

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As parents, it’s natural to wonder why a child needs to have a cavity filled, especially if it’s in a baby tooth. “Won’t that tooth eventually fall out?” you ask. Yes, it will. But there are some very important reasons why your family or pediatric dentist will want to preserve that primary tooth for as long as possible.Spread of Infection to Other Teeth Baby teeth decay very rapidly. A small cavity in one tooth today could be two decaying teeth at your child’s next dental checkup. Additionally, that same cavity can spread through the tooth down toward the developing permanent tooth... 

How to Treat Your Child’s Infectious Disease

How to Treat Your Child’s Infectious Disease

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Chickenpox Incubation period: One to three weeks Infectious period: The most infectious time is one to two days before the rash appears, but it continues to be infectious until all the blisters have crusted over. Symptoms Chickenpox is a mild infectious disease that most children catch at some time. It starts with feeling unwell, a rash and, usually, a fever. Spots develop, which are red and become fluid-filled blisters within a day or two. They eventually dry into scabs, which drop off. The spots first appear on the chest, back, head or neck, then spread. They don’t leave scars unless...