Community

Last updated on October 13th, 2013 at 03:35 pm

welcomeThey say it takes a village to raise a child. It’s doubly so when a child’s health and well-being is concerned. Welcome to our “village” where you can hear from our team of experts their thoughts on current and ongoing child health and safety issues as well as share stories in areas like how you’re handling a particular child health-related challenge or the ups-and-downs we face every day trying to keep kids safe. Our Pedsafe Forum is there for you anytime to ask questions and exchange ideas.

By the way – we use “pedsafe” as a tag in our posts and #pedsafe in our tweets so that we can always find each other’s posts and tweets …so please help us out and tag yours too.

Latest Community Posts

Safely Introduce Your Dog to Your New Baby

Safely Introduce Your Dog to Your New Baby

by

Many couples put off having that first child for a number of reasons:  To establish their career, to be more financially stable, some want to buy the house first…… But in their desire to nurture ‘something’, many (myself included) choose to get a dog – and the dog invariably takes on the role of substitute child. In my household, we refer to our dog as our ‘son’, and when we talk to him, we refer to each other as ‘Mommy’ and ‘Daddy.’ But as a professional dog trainer, one call I get quite often is, “We have had our dog for years, and he has always been so good….... 

Child Has a Severe Allergic Reaction: Can Your School Help Them?

Child Has a Severe Allergic Reaction: Can Your School Help Them?

by

The sad story of a seven year-old girl who was unwittingly given a peanut by a classmate in Virginia and later died from an allergic reaction has brought attention to the issues surrounding food allergies and medical treatment at schools. The school legally couldn’t give any medication that wasn’t supplied by the parent. What are the regulations at your child’s school around food allergies? Do they have an EpiPen on hand, and can they use it without written permission? How does your child’s school handle birthdays? Bake sales? My children know the strict “no sharing... 

To Our Wonderful Readers…An Important Update

To Our Wonderful Readers…An Important Update

by

We wanted to update you about some changes happening this year at Pediatric Safety… As many of you are probably aware, we have spent the last 9+ years publishing content that has allowed us to make a difference in the lives of families across the globe.  We’ve done our best to be there for you when you needed us.In the coming months we intend to implement a new “look” for Pediatric Safety and focus a bit more on areas where we believe we can provide a greater impact.  This is a fairly intensive effort, and truthfully, we don’t have the resources to do everything and do it well. ... 

When One Little Boy Said NO to Bullying… a Message for 2019

When One Little Boy Said NO to Bullying… a Message for 2019

by

Have you noticed…it’s hard to go a week without hearing or reading a story about bullying. There’s the “traditional” bullying we all knew growing up – and perhaps dismiss a bit too easily because of that. The skinny kid being shoved in the hallway…the mean rumors spread about one kid by the “in-crowd”. And then there’s the new “flavor” of torment –cyber-bullying. Where leaving school no longer brings relief but often just opens the door to a whole new world of abuse. By email, by phone, on social networks, the insults, the hurt just keeps coming. We read about it… We... 

5 Tantrum Parenting Mistakes and the Tamers That Keep You Sane

5 Tantrum Parenting Mistakes and the Tamers That Keep You Sane

by

No one wants to be the parent with the red-faced toddler screaming and crying at the grocery checkout because he can’t have Gummi Bears. But when parents attempt to calm kids down, they often get it wrong, according to experts. Here are the most common mistakes parents make — and what works instead. Tantrum Mistake No. 1: You try reasoning with him. Parents tend to keep talking and explaining to their overwrought child why he can’t have the thing he wants. “He’s emotionally wound up and incapable at that moment of being logical,” says Susan Stiffelman, a family therapist and author...